1943 GPW distance measurement needed

Torisco

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
499
0
16
Location
Bishop, California
Jeep side door curtain buttons and mirror.jpg

Can anyone provide me with the distance shown by the red line in the photo (bottom of steering wheel to top of seat frame bottom).

I believe the jeep I am restoring has had the steering column moved as I have to stuff myself in to get into the drivers seat with a 1" bottom cushion. Or, my beer belly has exceeded the TM specifications for a jeep driver!

The jeep has a Buick 198CI Fireball V6 engine in it from a previous owner and I believe that this may have been the cause? I have started dismantling the jeep but cannot visually tell if the steering column is attached in the right place.

The frame I.D. and the original data plates match. The body may be a CJA? that was added after the war as it has a rear PTO output via a splined female receptacle. The jeep also has a PTO lever by the drivers seat and a later model trans to support the PTO driveshaft to the rear.
 

Torisco

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
499
0
16
Location
Bishop, California
I sort of kind of had the same idea that you fellows have and thought maybe I should measure my own rotundness first.

I thought, if the steering column is the right height...there must have been some really slim G.I.'s around in 1943.

Then I tried to put on the jacket of my Army Dress Uniform from my enlisted days and could hardly get an arm into the thing!

In conclusion, I must have been some kind of really slim G.I. when I was in the Army. I think Ahab may have it right with the song he posted.

I will still get the measure as I really believe they moved the column when they installed the Buick V6. If I am wrong about this I am going to join the local gym and get some body work done on ME!
 

clinto

Moderator, wonderful human being & practicing Deuc
Staff member
Administrator
Super Moderator
Steel Soldiers Supporter
Supporting Vendor
12,461
255
83
Location
Athens, Ga.
Going to measure my '42. Be back tonight.

C
 

SETOYOTA

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
2,259
104
63
Location
georgia
My 44 GPW is 11 7/8 from the bottom of the wheel to the top of the seat bottom with no cushion. Unrestored all original condition
 

clinto

Moderator, wonderful human being & practicing Deuc
Staff member
Administrator
Super Moderator
Steel Soldiers Supporter
Supporting Vendor
12,461
255
83
Location
Athens, Ga.
From the top of the gas tank itself to the lowest point of the steering wheel is about 12 1/2". From the lowest point of the wheel to the top of the side tube of the seat frame looks to be about 11".

Look at the hole where the column comes through the floor-the tube should be perpendicular to the hole... i.e. going straight through it.
 

Amer-team

Active member
1,700
3
38
Location
Centralia/WA
1942 GPW have 11 1/2 inches from the bottom of wheel to the seat pan. Keep in mind the average size soldier back then was 5'8" and 145 pounds.

If you don't have an original tub, if it is a CJ2A, you might think about the old jeepers trick of sectioning out about 6 inches of the wheel well and setting the seat back that far. Did they cut your floor boards out to put the V6 in it? Sometimes they could take a T90 transmission and use and M38 or 38A1 crossmember to drop the trans so the floor did not have to be cut.
 

ageregunner

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
682
16
18
Location
Breinigsville, PA
The fact that vehicles were engineered for the average soldier in the time frame they were made, also gives us "healthy" collectors a good reason to watch our weight.
 

Torisco

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
499
0
16
Location
Bishop, California
The gap on your jeep looks somewhat bigger than a regular jeep! so, off to the gym with you.
The photo is from a finished restored 1942 jeep and not the 1943 jeep that I am working on at the current time. I used that photo to show where I needed the measurement.
Sorry, my error for not making that clear in the original posting.
 

Torisco

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
499
0
16
Location
Bishop, California
1942 GPW have 11 1/2 inches from the bottom of wheel to the seat pan. Keep in mind the average size soldier back then was 5'8" and 145 pounds.

If you don't have an original tub, if it is a CJ2A, you might think about the old jeepers trick of sectioning out about 6 inches of the wheel well and setting the seat back that far. Did they cut your floor boards out to put the V6 in it? Sometimes they could take a T90 transmission and use and M38 or 38A1 crossmember to drop the trans so the floor did not have to be cut.


I do not think that they cut the floor. They did use a different transmission cover that is much taller and more square than the stock cover.
I am in the process of trying to determine which transmission they used when they put in the V6

Pictures attached
 

Attachments

Amer-team

Active member
1,700
3
38
Location
Centralia/WA
Looks like a WW2 to me. It appears that they mounted a passenger seat frame in the drivers position. Are you going to restore it? That Buick V6 was probably one of the best conversions for a jeep. The heavy flywheel made them idle along really well. If you cleaned it up, brought it back to military configuration on the outside and left the V6 you would have a little hotrod. Looks like they gave it a lift under the front spring shackles. It is a little hard to tell, but it looks like they kept the stock steering, so the angle of your wheel is where it goes. In addition to the V6, they would usually put a saginaw steering box hung off the left front frame rail. Looks like the body is pretty solid. This is a good starter WW2 jeep. You have lots of options.
 

Torisco

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
499
0
16
Location
Bishop, California
Looks like a WW2 to me. It appears that they mounted a passenger seat frame in the drivers position. Are you going to restore it? That Buick V6 was probably one of the best conversions for a jeep. The heavy flywheel made them idle along really well. If you cleaned it up, brought it back to military configuration on the outside and left the V6 you would have a little hotrod. Looks like they gave it a lift under the front spring shackles. It is a little hard to tell, but it looks like they kept the stock steering, so the angle of your wheel is where it goes. In addition to the V6, they would usually put a saginaw steering box hung off the left front frame rail. Looks like the body is pretty solid. This is a good starter WW2 jeep. You have lots of options.



I am going to get a photo of the steering box as it sits against the frame at present. I will post it. I also found out when measuring the seat to steering wheel that the driver's seat frame looked like it had been cut and welded and may not be the correct frame for the drive's side?

The previous owner had made steel half doors and a elongated passenger seat which I will also post pictures of.

I am thinking about keeping the V6 and making everything alse WW2 GPW. I like the power this jeep has and it would be a nice WW2 hot rod GPW.

Here are my measurements against those I received in this thread so far.

Top of gas tank to lowest part of steering wheel..............My GPW is 11.25 inches ....in this thread the answers I got show 12.50 inches
Side tube of seat frame to lowest part of steering wheel...My GPW is 9.50 inches.....in this thread the answers I got show 11.00 inches
Seat frame metal bottom for cushion to steering wheel.....My GPW is 10.50 inches......in this thread the answers I got show 11 7/8 inches

There appears to be an overall difference of around 1.50 inches closer to the seat than found on the stock 41-45 GPW.
 

Torisco

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
499
0
16
Location
Bishop, California
Steering Column pictures

1942 GPW have 11 1/2 inches from the bottom of wheel to the seat pan. Keep in mind the average size soldier back then was 5'8" and 145 pounds.

If you don't have an original tub, if it is a CJ2A, you might think about the old jeepers trick of sectioning out about 6 inches of the wheel well and setting the seat back that far. Did they cut your floor boards out to put the V6 in it? Sometimes they could take a T90 transmission and use and M38 or 38A1 crossmember to drop the trans so the floor did not have to be cut.


Here are the pictures I said I would post.

The steering gear box has the exhaust manifold touching it as shown in the attached pictures.
Also, does the "S" represent a replacement Saginaw steering gear as you described earlier?
 

Attachments

clinto

Moderator, wonderful human being & practicing Deuc
Staff member
Administrator
Super Moderator
Steel Soldiers Supporter
Supporting Vendor
12,461
255
83
Location
Athens, Ga.
I'd call that Saginaw.

I do not think your column or wheel are in the wrong place. See my Jeep I shot 20 minutes ago:

20141230_175628.jpg20141230_191440.jpg20141230_191412.jpg20141230_175540.jpg

AAAAAAARRRRRRGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH. Why won't my pics ever post right side up? Now I have to post them to photobucket and re-download them right side up, I guess to strip the data out of them.

Let's try this again.

20141230_191440_zpsbbe93023.jpg20141230_191412_zps337df727.jpg20141230_191318_zps2682871b.jpg20141230_175628_zps7671adba.jpg20141230_175540_zps0d2a8f4b (1).jpg

Your front spring does have a lift block on it.

20141230_175706_zpsb372d71c.jpg

I'll bet there's a T90 trans under there and an overdrive on the transfer.

Depending upon how good the frame and tub are, I'd do it right (I'd find a correct engine and trans).

WWII Jeeps are a good investment if done right.
 

Torisco

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
499
0
16
Location
Bishop, California
There is no spacer there upon inspection. However, the attachment holes seem out of skew as though the column was mounted a bit higher to the floor board.
 
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website like our supporting vendors. Their ads help keep Steel Soldiers going. Please consider disabling your ad blockers for the site. Thanks!

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks