Essential Tools to have for an FMTV? Add your .02

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Floridianson

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The inaccuracy of even high-quality torque wrenches is severe, and worse when combined with the inaccuracy of the nut torque's relationship with properly preloading the bolt. We're talking +/- 35% on unlubricated bolts ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolted_joint ). Torque wrench, "mark torque method", shaman's vision... all little more than a guess in the right direction.
I take care of my Precision Instruments split beam and it shows 4% no where close to +/- 35%. This is not a cheap beam torque wrench and I trust it. I do ad couple of drops of oil to the threads as the manufacture recommends. Your truck as always do what you think is best. Myself when using my 915A2 and 373A2 trailer on the highway grossing 40k I know my wheels are real close to specs.
 

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Awesomeness

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I take care of my Precision Instruments split beam and it shows 4% no where close to +/- 35%. This is not a cheap beam torque wrench and I trust it. I do ad couple of drops of oil to the threads as the manufacture recommends. Your truck as always do what you think is best. Myself when using my 915A2 and 373A2 trailer on the highway grossing 40k I know my wheels are real close to specs.
Doesn't matter, you're still getting a huge difference, like 35%. Even if your torque wrench can get the torque on the head within 4%, getting the torque on the head that close only results in a +/-35% tension ("preload") on the bolt!

Using a torque wrench is better than nothing... it's "some" process control, but you're kidding yourself if you think you're actually creating a consistent clamping force. You can go read for yourself - there are lots of empirical studies on it - which is why I linked the Wikipedia article, to start you off if you wanted to.

Torquing cleaned and lubricated bolts drops the error to +/-25%.
 
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Awesomeness

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You havent ever had a tire break away from the rim where there was no way to air it up thru a valve stem because i have been plaged with it and either got us back rollong
To elaborate on why Wheelspinner is correct, with a beadlock rim the beads of the tire are literally clamped to the rim on both sides. Unless you rip the bead off the tire, it physically can not come off, even at 0PSI.

In this picture, which is actually a HMMWV tire I think, but similar to FMTV tires, that beadlock ring goes inside the tire between the two beads. Then when you bolt the two halves of the rim together, it sandwiches the beads against the beadlock.

2PieceBeadlock.gif

If you've had issues breaking a tire loose on your truck, you should try them out. They're awesome!
 

chucky

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Well it must not have happend cause you havnt ever seen or read it in a TM i must have imagined it for the 2 hrs that day it happend and how the either got the bead pushed back against the rim long enough to get the air hose to it!!!! When people post on SS theyre not here to banter with you things that have happend to them and how what happend could help other SS readers. Bullys like you make this whole thing distasteful
 

Coffey1

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Where you going to store all of this stuff.
They didn't bless the FMTV with a lot of storage.
 

Suprman

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I have seen that happen. Just not on a lmtv wheel. Happens all the time on civilian setups. The military has the tire bead clamped down on both sides between the beadlock and rim pieces so that common civilian situation won’t happen. I don’t think you are being bullied. He is clearly stating a fact. If somehow you were able to mount a lmtv tire and inflate it without the beadlock in place it could possibly happen. But that would only be due to improper installation.
 

chucky

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I dont know who how or whats in the tire i had to fix but for anyone to tell me what hapend didnt must be out to push folks buttons it worked on me
 

Awesomeness

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I dont know who how or whats in the tire i had to fix but for anyone to tell me what hapend didnt must be out to push folks buttons it worked on me
If you say yourself that you don't know what's in the tire, how can you be so sure that you've personally seen a tire come off the beadlock? Trick question... you can't. If that pushes your buttons, that's on you.
 

simp5782

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If you say yourself that you don't know what's in the tire, how can you be so sure that you've personally seen a tire come off the beadlock? Trick question... you can't. If that pushes your buttons, that's on you.
I will let you rookies in on a little secret. Beadlocks can fail and a tire can come off the bead. Especially the strap type hutchinson beadlocks. Some of the bolts that were used with the straps especially on early production ones were not fitted with stainless steel bolts. or the Motor pool/contract center used whatever bolts they could find. They rusted and got weak from internal moisture. When driving on a flat the increased stress on the bolts caused them to break off and the straps would come loose causing it to expand and it would seperate in the middle causing a weak spot on the bead and or cause the insert to bend. I have taken apart more than a few flat ran 395s with the internal straps busted. I could always tell the strap was busted before hand cause the wheel face would break the bead way to easy with 1 hit. Over a normal 4 or 6 from a crowbar.


I also had one i tried to air back up that was flat even with a beadlock if you do not have the necessary air pressure to get the air to seat it up it won't air up very easy. I end up on low capacity trucks like an FMTV having to use a 20inch bike innertube and inflate it around the inside lip of the wheel to get the bead to seat easier with the low capacity tanks. IF you have a shop tank or even enough air tanks like the M915 series trucks then airing up shouldnt be an issue.

I would much rather have the old m939 rubber beadlocks over that strap together version.

Moral of the story is that if you take your tires/wheels apart. Replace the bolts with stainless steel ones. They are 3/8" threads x 1.5" long
 
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Awesomeness

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I will let you rookies in on a little secret. Beadlocks can fail and a tire can come off the bead.
I don't think that's a secret, especially since those you've seen fail did so because they were poorly maintained and malfunctioning. Beadlocks are a design intended specifically keep the tire from coming off the rim, in situations that would do it to non-beadlocked tires. When functioning correctly, the beadlock rim will destroy the tire before the bead comes off the rim. (I think you've even posted some pictures like that, where the sidewall and carcass are mangled and destroyed, but the bead is still in the rim. Maybe it was somebody else.)

My original point was that if you're having to bring equipment to reseat beads, beadlocks are the solution to that problem (and FMTVs have them already). I'm not sure why Chucky found that so offensive. If you're carrying a can of starter fluid you're far more likely to need it to actually start the engine than you will to reseat an undamaged FMTV tire that has come off the rim. (And for that reason, you should probably carry it anyway.)

On the topic of broken beadlocks, have you seen either the one-piece or 3-piece runflats fail as beadlocks? They seem pretty indestructible, but anything is possible.

TireFlatOnBeadlock.jpg
(It was Aleigh.)
 
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chucky

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ok you want to keep pushing why dont you re-read the whole post i said the limb pushed into the tire at the edge of the rim and pushed the bead in . when i got the wood dug out is when im useing the either to blow the sidewall back against the rim to get the tire to take air at the valve stem i would give a hundred bucks if i had taken a picture or a video but i didnt think i would have to document a breakdown for people like you that sit around forums doubting and saying it couldnt happen if you wernt there then keep your skeptisisms to your self and perry mason ive never had the tires on this truck off the rims so i have no idea whats in or missing im telling u what i saw and what happend
 

Awesomeness

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the limb pushed into the tire at the edge of the rim and pushed the bead in . ... ive never had the tires on this truck off the rims so i have no idea whats in or missing im telling u what i saw and what happend
If that was on an FMTV, you should take the tires off and find out what is wrong, instead of acting like such a snowflake that someone disagreed with you. I don't have any problem with you personally, but your story can not physically happen with these beadlocked rims installed and functioning correctly. The bead is clamped to both sides of the rim, all the way around, and the tire sidewall will fail before the beadlock will because it is the weak link. Look at that picture above.
 

8madjack

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Doesn't matter, you're still getting a huge difference, like 35%. Even if your torque wrench can get the torque on the head within 4%, getting the torque on the head that close only results in a +/-35% tension ("preload") on the bolt!

Using a torque wrench is better than nothing... it's "some" process control, but you're kidding yourself if you think you're actually creating a consistent clamping force. You can go read for yourself - there are lots of empirical studies on it - which is why I linked the Wikipedia article, to start you off if you wanted to.

Torquing cleaned and lubricated bolts drops the error to +/-25%.
I use the same precision instruments torque wrench. I get your point, but there is no reasonable solution other than a torque wrench. It's not like we have sonic strain guages or are going to use dial indicators to measure bolt stretch. When I was an aircraft mechanic we used torque wrenches so at least there is repeatability and some equity between the other fasteners. My point is, even if the 35% number is accurate its good enough for industry, minus nasa and the like.
 

simp5782

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I've seen the new composite runflats that were bent and damaged. Probably from a heavy HEMTT wrecker or CAT III mrap. The rubber runflats should be discarded after usage on a flat.
 

Fishinshane

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Im doing a 2000 mile trip and would like to know what TM manual would be best to have in the M1079 for the drive?
Preffer to only have the most helpful of all the manual on hand as i will be flying out and to pick up the truck to drive back.
Trip will be from Washington,Mo to Hood River,Or
 

themeec

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Had this thread bookmarked for a while, and wanted to put my own summary on here, to get some clarification on a few items. Hats off to coachgeo for putting this thing together, but there were some specifics I still would like to clarify. I've included some size ranges on those I could find, since I noticed some came in sets, and listed the drive size for the air tools to get some further clarification on what's needed/necessary there:

NOTE: Some of these might seem like a "duh, how do you not have this already", but bear in mind I have basic tools for my Bimmer, but nothing larger/more complex.

Impact Sockets (deep well) 8-46mm/1" drive
Impact Sockets 8-46mm 1/2" drive
Allen Sockets 14-27mm 1" drive
Allen Sockets (sizes?) 1/2" drive
40" breaker bars x2 (1" and 1/2" drive)
Multi-meter
1" drive Air Impact Wrench
1/2" drive Air Ratchet
Compressor for impact and ratchet
Heavy Duty U-Joint Puller (Is this a serviceable one? Read a few internet fights over OEM Tools vs. OTC variants with no real conclusion on quality)
20-Ton Bottle Jack x2
Heavy wheel chocks x4
Air hose w/gladhand
 

simp5782

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If you do not add additional air tanks then your 1 inch impact is going to be limited to 1 lug nut every minute or two. I ditched air impacts a while ago as on onboard carry around tool. Lots of room with only 1 purpose.

The Milwaukee 18v fuel series 1/2" guns and the Dewalt 20v guns will do just about everything on these trucks. I have the big boy and the smaller 1/2" version. https://youtu.be/c1nd9PmCz_4
 
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