How to remove the Fuel Shutoff Rod on the IP

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gimpyrobb

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Was your truck running before the fuel shut off stuck? As far as removing the rod its pretty simple. When you remove the shut off cover you will see the arm attached to the fuel control rod. There should be a bridge piece with 2 screws and safety wire going through the screws. On the bottom of the arm there is a tiny Jesus clip that attaches that arm to a rod that goes inward and to the back of the pump. To remove the rod simply pull the Jesus clip, don't lose it, and then cut the safety wire and remove the 2 screws. Very carefully pull the control rod strait out. The reason I say carefully is there is a little "tit" on the very end of the rod that can slide out and fall into the pump. Make sure this tiny piece is still there. The o ring will be around the rod.
Steps to follow.

1 - Disconnect batteries
2 - Remove side cover from IP
3 - Remove "Jesus" clip from fuel control rod - Do Not loose
4 - Disengage the fuel control rod
5 - Cut and remove safety wire
6 - Remove two screws and metal bridge
7 - Carefully pry out the shutoff rod - DO NOT loose the plunger sleeve pin (tit) at the end of the rod
8 - No need to remove nut and the lever from the rod unless it is also gummed up. If you do remove it make sure you scribe a mark so you can reinstall properly
9 - Clean all the gunk of the rod. Carb cleaner works well. Also so steel wool or emery cloth. Do not remove any metal.
10 - Use the carb cleaner to clean the opening and the plunger sleeve - you may need a mirror and flashlight to see it

fuel rod 2.gifplunger sleeve.jpg

While you are at it you might as well replace the o-ring. It is a #13 and available at most hardware stores.

This next step is the hardest.

11 - Reinstall the shutoff rod. You have to make sure the "tit" engages the the plunger sleeve. It may take 2 or more tries. One way to do it is to make sure the sleeve is all the way down and you are holding the lever in the proper orientation so the pin is also towards the bottom. It is mainly a "feel" install.

Rotate the fuel arm and see if it stops moving. The range should be from 7-8 o'clock to 4-5 o'clock. If it has more than that the pin has not engaged the sleeve correctly.
plunger sleeve Fuel Rod (1).jpg

12- Reinstall the two screws and bridge.
13- Reinstall the safety wire. Most people do. Some do not
14 - Reinstall the control rod
15 - Reinstall the "Jesus" clip
16 - Reinstall the side cover (you may want to do this last so you can check the operation of the rod)
17 - Reconnect batteries
18 - Remove the air intake mushroom cover. While you have someone standing by the air intake with a board, start the engine. If it runs away have soldier B cover the intake with the board. Rehearse this in advance so no one is suprised
 

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gimpyrobb

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Sometimes they get crud in there and you might have to take it apart to clean it up. You might be able to see in the second pic the rust I had to clean up.

If you need to disassemble the rod for cleaning make sure you scribe the pieces before disassemble. Also take a lot of pictures. The pieces have to go back together the same way or the IP will not function properly
 

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Warthog

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With so many people having sticking fuel shutoff rods I created this sticky from Welldigger and Gimpys post. I also listed the steps in numerical order. Thanks Gimp for posting the pictures over and over.

Now just refer people to the sticky.
 

Floridianson

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Just to add a side note.

When you go to put the fuel control rod back into the head since the control collar (plunger sleeve) is down, the fuel control assembly linkage arm is going to look like it is around the 4 to 5 o'clock position or real close to the shut off position.

So hold the control assembly arm close to that position and adjust the pin to the horizontal position and it should slide in. Might have to move the fuel arm just a little but it will go in.
 
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icecreamman

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Barring bad weather this weekend, I'm attempting this procedure this weekend. I have gotten my fuel shut off more loose but not floppy? Question----if I remove the shut-off with the arm in the 6oclock position, will something attached to the plunger automatically spring the plunger? to another position?

Also, should the assembly be lubed with anything before re-assembly?

Thanks in advance.
 

Warthog

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The plunger (when it is not sticking) will fall to the bottom. This requires the rod to be reinserted with the arm in the 4-5 o'clock position. This allows the pin to engage the plunger.

A little oil on the o-ring is all that is needed. The rest will be self lubricated when the engine is running.
 
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icecreamman

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Finally got an afternoon off of work without the in-laws finding out:)

Snipped the safety wire, slid everything out in tact, drowned the assembly with Kroyl then carb cleaner,Kroyl then carb cleaner over and over. Smooth as silk:)

Now that I have it in my hands in front of my eyes? It's simple. I get it.

Note to others, If you are using the tit or plunger to force lubricant through the assembly, keep your finger firmly over the tit. It will eject out of your control and land at least a foot away from where it should:(
 

Lonesome715

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Sometimes they get crud in there and you might have to take it apart to clean it up. You might be able to see in the second pic the rust I had to clean up.

If you need to disassemble the rod for cleaning make sure you scribe the pieces before disassemble. Also take a lot of pictures. The pieces have to go back together the same way or the IP will not function properly
This is what I ran into before on my 87 M35. it worked out. This not so lucky.
 

Davis Welding

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I removed the fuel rod cover today to re-safety wire the bridge screws after having to clean the shut off. It seems I have some diesel fuel behind that cover when I pulled it this time. I am pretty sure that is not supposed to be there (?) I just read the thread about the HH rebuild and it was mentioned that a leaking oring in this area can fill the crank with diesel. Maybe I need to service my HH?
 

Wolfgang the Gray

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Is this the part that if you do it wrong, the engine goes runaway and then explodes?

Newbie mechanic sitting in the fetal position, rocking back & forth, as images of black smoke and screaming engines cycle through his head. :drool:
 

Floridianson

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Well yes. If you watch what you are doing there is not problem. There was a case where the OP did not put the fuel control in right and the collar pin was to the rear instead of being forward. Here when the motor started instead of going to idle it went to wide open. OP's fault and no excuse with all the threads, TM's and pics.
When ever we take off or replace the Head it is a good idea to turn it upside down and then back up right. Here we are looking for free movement of the collar it should slide easy and be on the bottom when the head is installed. Do not work on IP in the grass or dirt if you drop the pin you will not find it. Worse case spread out tarp and drive up on it. Read twice do once and all will be good. As said as long as the fuel control is working free and clear when you are done it is a easy job.
 
I will be addressing what I believe to be a stuck shut-off valve in the next day or so.
As best I can tell, the Shut-Off got "sticky" the last time I drove the Deuce, and most recently she suffered a NO START condition.

I have never been inside this assembly!

My questions are simply these.....

- Since I serious doubt the rod is radically sticky, would it be necessary to do the whole disassembly?

- Or, would just opening the cover and liberally spraying carb-cleaner into the "guts" to free and "rinse" the moving parts be adequate?

- Is FULL disassembly a worthy preventative maintenance project?

Since Soldier B will be out of town through this weekend I'm a bit concerned about a runaway on start-up if there's been a reassembly glitch.

I don't generally like short-cuts and try to do a thorough job if I've taken the time to get inside of something in the first place. But the concern over a trashed engine is a bit disconcerting. If it would be practical to avoid that possibility, then I'm willing to take the lesser route to stay out of harm's way.

THANK YOU for any experience-based advise! I'm sure others will benefit in the future as well.
 

Scar59

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The first step in preventative maintenance is cleaning, try it, just remove the cover and give it a good shot of brake/carb cleaner, actuate the lever and spray it again. A little compressed air to blow it out (not blow it up). See if she starts.
 

gimpyrobb

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Sometimes all it takes is pulling the cover and pushing the rod back and forth. I'd try that before spraying anything.
 
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As a cautionary note, most otc spray carb cleaners are pretty harsh on things like O rings and rubber seals and gaskets. If used, afterwards its best to clean/rinse with the fuel your using that is normally in contact with these parts. Not always easy to do unless you completely disassemble the item. viton o-rings are pretty tough though. If you can find the cleaner in liquid form you might try selectively brushing it on the parts in question rather than a spray. also the stearing box is below this so you might not want to get a lot of carb cleaner on it. a heavy rag or tin foil diverter over it should be all that is needed.
 
The first step in preventative maintenance is cleaning, try it, just remove the cover and give it a good shot of brake/carb cleaner, actuate the lever and spray it again. A little compressed air to blow it out (not blow it up). See if she starts.
Roger!
And thanks.
Sometimes all it takes is pulling the cover and pushing the rod back and forth. I'd try that before spraying anything.
Huh!

So simple even a caveman could do it.

Looks like I'll crack it open either Friday evening or bright and early Saturday morning.

THANKS !
OK, it's Friday evening and i have been inside the cover......

Opened it up (surprisingly easy other then reaching over and "behind" the heater box & fan) and found it to be CLEAN AS A WHISTLE !
I put my finger under/below the retainer bar and the shut-off moved freely, and even returned to the RUN position without any force on
my part. I flipped it back and forth several times with absolutely NO resistance other than the auto-return action which was both expected and "normal".

SOOooo...

As a cautionary note, most otc spray carb cleaners are pretty harsh on things like O rings and rubber seals and gaskets. If used, afterwards its best to clean/rinse with the fuel your using that is normally in contact with these parts. Not always easy to do unless you completely disassemble the item. viton o-rings are pretty tough though. If you can find the cleaner in liquid form you might try selectively brushing it on the parts in question rather than a spray. also the stearing box is below this so you might not want to get a lot of carb cleaner on it. a heavy rag or tin foil diverter over it should be all that is needed.
... I shielded the steering box and carefully did a light flushing of the inside of the mechanism with some GUMOUT brand Carb Cleaner.
Again, I checked the movement and then buttoned it back up.

BAD NEWS.... Still NO START ! ! !


NOTE:
Once all necessary tools, a stool, etc. were collected the whole OPEN COVER, INSPECT, CLEAN, RE-COVER procedure took LESS THAN 20 MINUTES ! ! !


The one thing that I have not yet PM'd would be replacing the AIR FILTER Cartridge. (Currently installed Air Filter is about 8 months and less than 400 miles old.) It appears to be reasonably clean. Although, I MUST consider that dusty old west Texas has had a relatively moist spring, summer and early fall. Any dusting/caking of the filter's membrane could have become a hardened "crust". I am now speculating that instead of the engine being fuel starved, it may be SUFFOCATING.
I have Air Filters in inventory, so at dawn's early light I will be replacing it and retrying the start-up.

I KNOW that the three things a multi-fuel engine needs to run are FUEL, AIR and COMPRESSION (induced by the starter rotating the crankshaft). So, until I check the aspiration, and have some daylight, I'm headed for the shower.

I am hoping that this NO START is simple and not a Hydraulic Head failure or something more serious.
In the meantime.... The troubleshooting continues to pursue each NEXT INDICATED STEP.
 
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gimpyrobb

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I hate to say it, it will not be the air filter. Sounds like your button retaining clip might have fallen off.

I urge you to pull the Hyd head before doing anything else. I have seen the buttons destroyed from being hammered after they fall off. If it is just that it fell off, a new retaining clip will fix the issue, but not if the button is shot to heck.
 
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