Meet Mr Rusty

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cucvrus

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Have you used this hydraulic hose for the transmission cooler lines before?

It's maximum temp rating is 212F. www.parker.com/parkerimages/euro_hpd/Flyer/4480_P13_UK.pdf

Transmissions can exceed that with mild/moderate use.
Really. I don't need you casting aspersions on my work. I am not a first timer on repairs. This is a very low pressure application. I have used it in the past. I use it on equipment and that is under pressure and gets hot. I am willing to give it a try. I didn't add any text to my post because I had a problem with the keyboard. I used it on engine oil cooler lines and other applications. I am sure it will not just fade away and burst if it reaches over 212*. I seen 3/8" fuel line in place of steel transmission cooler lines. They were holding up. Not something I would do. But it is something I have corrected in the past for customers. But I guess going forward I can use 300* Gates with hose clamps. I have my doubts that it will fail during plowing. But I will keep that in mind. I am not building the space shuttle here. [h=1]27057 3/8 X 3FT TOC HOSE[/h]The combination of high temperature and high pressure could reduce the hose life. I read the fine print on my selection of hose. I doubt this truck reaches that temperature. But I will inquire at the hydraulic shop. Have a HAPPY SAFE DAY.
 

cucvrus

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Imagine that the oil pan is rusted thru on Mr Rusty. I have over half the bolts out and am going to get eyeball deep in getting the oil dip stick tube off the manifold stud. I may need to locate another dipstick tube. I still have the rear studs to deal with that hold the engine oil cooler lines in place. Or Not. I have tied them up out of the way and have them secure away from abrasions. Some of the M6 oil pan bolts that have 10MM bolt heads have decayed down to 3/8". That is 9.525 MM. I wonder if Snap-On has a socket for that? Just joking I got them out with the 3/8" and a hammer. Safety glasses and getting very dirty are standard equipment on this job. The exhaust is rotted off at the manifolds. Surprisingly the cab floor is still solid and the mounts are still in place and secure. It has been 4 years and the parts I replaced are looking like they are OEM parts. Very Rusty. OK. Tonight I am off duty with family. I will report back and report my findings from the hydraulic shop on hose bursting and failure. Please remain positive in light of all the negative findings. I am positive and am the one doing all the work solo out laying on cardboard in the stones. My handy dandy LED dusk to dawn light I picked up works better than any trouble light I ever had and is tough and cool to the touch. Have a great Day Be Safe. Friday is the next day for progress. Till then watch the reruns. Enjoy.
 

cucvrus

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OK. Class dismissed? I knew this and attended the refresher course. I am still OK with my choice of lines. I will report back if I have any failures. But I am sure they will work better and hold up better than rusted thin steel tubes with compression fittings. And I see these on many older vehicles I get to work on. I suggest to replace them but most times guys say they still work. I will fix it when its is broken. Periodic spikes in temperature at low pressure are not going to cause a catastrophic failure of the new lines I installed. But I will report back. I liked the ease of installation, fit and finish of the new lines. Can we move on from here? I am NOT recommending anyone else use them. I used them. Any failures or successes I am able to handle. I did make a call this morning to the hydraulic shop and they said if it was an issue they would replace the hoses with higher temperature rated hose. They were confident that it would hold up and said the hose has a safety tolerance built in. Unlike the engine and transmission that would meltdown under hi heat long before the cooler lines. Keeping the fluid and filter clean will help maintain a cooler running transmission has been my experience. Same as a newer clean radiator and maintained cooling system. These trucks tend to run very cool during plowing operations has been my experience. Have a Great Day. It has been a great debate topic. I could always check the towing capacity of the hoses I installed.
 

cucvrus

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https://www.summitracing.com/parts/a...1501/overview/
Had I known they were available I may have gone this route. I had ask a few times on here for ideas. Always after the fact someone wants to answer with a BBD. Bigger, Better, Deal. I did make the length right. I made my hoses 90". Not sure how the guy ended up coiling 1 1/2'. 90" was the right length. And these were braided ones were $50. cheaper but that is with out delivery fees. I am still good to go. The braided ones look show car. The black hydraulic lines look like the belong there. Thank you for the last answers. I didn't know. Be Safe. I looked free shipping.
 
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cucvrus

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I see it but I don't believe it. This oil pan on Mr. rusty has been off before and someone fixed the rust holes. Who fixes rusted out oil pans. If they are that bad they need replaced. I took a pick hammer and tapped on the pan at a few places and the hammer went right thru the pan all over. I was easily able to find all the replacement parts in my hoard. I never seen someone add tubing to a dip stick tube and use compression fittings to make the tube fit. My next obstacle will be to get the rust encrusted nuts from the stud on the exhaust manifold. I am up for the challenge. I will heat the stud/nut red hot and go from there. Ideally I would like to get the entire stud/bolt from the manifold. All 3 as a matter of fact. That may be the challenge over load. But I am going to get the dip stick stud / nut for sure. From that point I am on easy street. It does appear that the rear main seal is not leaking. I will sleep on that decision to change that. If it ain't broke don't fix it comes to mind. but sometimes there is exceptions to common sense rules. I had to get a new keyboard so I could type these posts. My other one just conked out with warning. Sort of like the CUCV project. Rain came right after I removed the pan. I had hoped to get the stud nut started. More later. Be Safe and have a Great Day.
 

o1951

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I am amazed that you are doing all this while laying on your back on a piece of cardboard on a gravel driveway.
Until you told us, I thought you had a lift at work that you were using after hours.
You must be a young guy. No go for someone my age (76).
 

cucvrus

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Well I am not 76 I will be 60 soon. I have a garage with a cement floor. I would rather work outdoors in natural light and have the project move along at a comfortable pace. If it rains I don't work on my outside project. I have a couple inside projects and a couple off site projects. I just bought 50 ft of scaffolding to start on another building maintenance project. I am never without something to do. It is like an all you can eat buffet. Keep the plate full and take a bite out of each entrée. Eventually one of them runs out and the project is complete. Keep getting the list filled up and you will never be bored. I have projects I hate and projects I love. Most are just a simple task and I work at each one as best I can as time and weather allow. Laying on cardboard is great. I get new work surface everyday and recycle the old one. Have a Great Day. I look forward to the manifold nut challenge today. I have all the parts ready including an oil pan I harvested from a parts engine. That was easy.
 

cucvrus

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DSCF6337.jpgDSCF6328.jpgDSCF6329.jpgYes that oil pan should have been scrapped the last time it was off. DSCF6327.jpgI cleaned a good used one primed and painted it. DSCF6330.jpg Nice stud. I decided to tackle the stud nut for the dip stick while the paint dried. DSCF6334.jpgThat was easy. 5 minutes and it was off. The paint was not dry yet. While I was under the hood I noticed a brake line sweating DOT 5. That was also very easy. I have the parts in storage for years and never used them. DSCF6335.jpgLeft you have the Rusty ones. And on the right the replacements. Nice that I didn't have to bend them. I think the OEM replacements will outlast the truck. DSCF6336.jpgDSCF6337.jpgThe original starter and new starter bolts. Picked up at the rebuilders today. DSCF6338.jpgLooks great under the hood. New M 8 flange nut on the dipstick stud. It is an M8 from an Isuzu. Brand new. I have a free selection of new fasteners. Have a Great Day. I plan on installing the oil pan with The Right Stuff as the gasket. I am confident it will work out. I se no point in changing the rear main seal. It is not leaking and has been changed before. Let sleeping dogs lie. Have a Great Weekend and Be Safe.
 

cucvrus

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I was able to get the oil pan back on today. The owner stopped by and added a few things to the list. he told me the block heater don't sem to work. While I was under putting the oil pan on I plugged it in to se if I could hear the element heat up. It does make a sound I heard them many times over the years. It did not make a sound. I went up with my 10 MM socket and ratchet and it felt like a shock in my hand. I have arthrits in my wrist and occasionally experience pain. I went up again and sure enough it was electrical current that was shocking me. I unplugged the block heater and it was gone. I never seen one shorted out and wondered how it don't kick the breaker. That was about all I finished on that project today. I went back in the mountains and continued razing a double wide modular home. Tomorrow I want to get the starter, and drive shafts back on the truck. Then I will remove that shocking block heater. They have it in the rear soft plug on the left side. I always us the center plug. It looks clocked wrong to me. that may be why it is shorted and shocking me. I read that the element should NOT make contact with any other part of the block. I think in the position it is in it is turned front and touching inside. Only one way to tell. Pull it out. Make the big mess and replace it. Have a Great Weekend. Be Safe and stay dry.
 

o1951

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Next time you may not be so lucky!
Your shop outlet needs a GFCI or the circuit breaker changed to a AFCI/GFCI
Getting shocked under a truck, where you cannot readily get clear is a good way to get fatal fibrillation.

I enjoy reading your posts.
Go spend $5.00 and buy a good GFCI outlet. Takes about 10 min to install- less if you forget to turn off juice.
 
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cucvrus

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Location
Jonestown Pennsylvania
My barn is plugged into the outside outlets on the house. They do have the safeties built in. They pop every time it rains and the kids pool is running. I was a very slight jolt but I was aware that it had current. If I had permanent wiring in my barn the insurance would go thru the roof. It is about 100 years old and has knob and tube wiring. I was warned about the liability and told to get it rewired or not the leave the electric on unattended. So I plug it in and unplug it. Someday. Maybe. Maybe NOT. I am waiting till I retire and need something to do and spend money on.
 
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Tracer

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Hawthorne, NV.
My barn is plugged into the outside outlets on the house. They do have the safeties built in. They pop every time it rains and the kids pool is running. I was a very slight jolt but I was aware that it had current. If I had permanent wiring in my barn the insurance would go thru the roof. It is about 100 years old and has knob and tube wiring. I was warned about the liability and told to get it rewired or not the leave the electric on unattended. So I plug it in and unplug it. Someday. Maybe. Maybe NOT. I am waiting till I retire and need something to do and spend money on.
cucvrus, speaking from over 4 years in retirement. Once you retire, you will have more to do than when you were working. And you will have lots of things to spend money on, such as Honey Do's.
 

o1951

Active member
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Location
Bergen County, NJ
It is about 100 years old and has knob and tube wiring. I was warned about the liability and told to get it rewired or not the leave the electric on unattended. So I plug it in and unplug it. Someday. Maybe. Maybe NOT. I am waiting till I retire and need something to do and spend money on.
HMM- Knob & tube is 2 wire, no ground. Good stuff in it's day.
Trouble with it is fabric over rubber covering deteriorates over many decades, sometimes leaving wires bare.

GFCI should shut off juice before most people can feel it.

I have GFCI outlets, but they now say outlets should be replaced every 10 years.
I am not too keen on that.

For part of my career, I worked as an electrician, and saw people get hurt.
I use an older version of this when using power tools near metal- cars, in basement around pipes, etc.
Figure cheap insurance against wife becoming premature widow. Figure cheap insurance for $35.

Click on image just below.

CEP Power Cord 2 ft. In-Line GFCI, 3 NEMA 5-15R Connector
GFCI-1244G2
SALE $34.95
Order Options:
Qty:
PRODUCT:

2 Foot In-Line GFCI Protected Power Cord with LED power light, 12/3 SJTW, Triple-Tap NEMA 5-15P Plugs, 1 NEMA 5-15R Connector, 15A/125V. UL Listed. Price/Each. (Shipping Lead Time is 1-2 Business Days)
DESCRIPTION:

CEP #1244G2 2 foot in-line GFCI, 12/3 Vinyl SJTW, triple-tap connector, 5-15 Plug, 5-15 Outlets. OSHA compliant and jobsite tested. Attachable GFCI plugs can be attached to any power tool or cord set up to 12/3 wire to make it meet OSHA specs for GFCI protection.
 
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