MEP-003A hook up question

vanderwoude

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"L0 is bonded to the frame where the two groups of wires come out of the generator head itself, they go into the lower control panel on the left, but one of those wires also swings back around and bonds L0 to the frame...that's the one that should be disconnected and isolated. This is a picture I took a while back for someone else, but it shows the bonding wire."

I just looked at the connections and would have a lot of hassel in disconnecting and re-connecting LO from the grounding split bolt; instead I will clip the wire from LO, as close as I can to the back of the split bolt lug, strip it and put a large wire nut on it. If I use the gen as a SDS, i can just uncap the LO wire and fasten it in the split bolt along with my ground rod wire.
 

tm050712

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MEP-002A: Ground wire for 120v connection?

Hi Guys - I've been following this and other threads regarding connecting my 002 to a small cabin I have. The cabin is already wired and has a meter base (with ground rod) that will not be connected to the power company grid for quite some time (transfer switch not presently needed). I plan on using the 120v mode for the connection to the breaker panel so I won't have to be concerned with balancing loads like I would if I used a 220v connection.

Based on what I've read so far here and in the TM, I believe that my connection should be: L-3 (hot) to lugs on breaker panel and L-1 (neutral) to neutral/ground buss on the breaker panel. My question is: Where should the Ground wire be connected - L-1, L-O, or not at all? The Change 6 wiring modification mentioned in the TM has been made. Any advice will be greatly appreciated.
 

derf

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Hi Guys - I've been following this and other threads regarding connecting my 002 to a small cabin I have. The cabin is already wired and has a meter base (with ground rod) that will not be connected to the power company grid for quite some time (transfer switch not presently needed). I plan on using the 120v mode for the connection to the breaker panel so I won't have to be concerned with balancing loads like I would if I used a 220v connection.

Based on what I've read so far here and in the TM, I believe that my connection should be: L-3 (hot) to lugs on breaker panel and L-1 (neutral) to neutral/ground buss on the breaker panel. My question is: Where should the Ground wire be connected - L-1, L-O, or not at all? The Change 6 wiring modification mentioned in the TM has been made. Any advice will be greatly appreciated.
If you go that way you should probably wire one side of your panel and put all your loads (breakers) on that side.
I would just wire it 220 and maybe try and put 1/2 the loads on one side of the panel and 1/2 the loads on the other side.
I don't know if it is against code to jump a single 120V leg to both sides of a 220V panel but is surely seems incorrect.
Unless you are planning to run it way up near full capacity and can't possibly split the load logically in the panel I would be more worried about questionable wiring than unbalanced loads.
Just my opinion. Many people like to backfeed through their dryer outlet and that works, too, but sometimes there are surely better ways to do things.

 

tm050712

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Derf, thanks for the suggestion to just connect to one side of the breaker panel - I plan on doing just that. Balancing would be a problem so I believe that the 120v configuration is the best way for me to go. I still have the question about grounding at the generator though. The only connections I've seen so far just mention the L-3 hot and the L-1 neutral. You would think that the TM would cover that.
 

derf

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In the field the military guys aren't usually powering residential panels. They usually wire gens to other military equipment that was designed and built to be powered by military gens.

There are lengthy threads about proper grounding, which is important.
 

tm050712

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I've called myself reading all of the threads on here about proper grounding when connecting to a residential breaker panel, but it seems they all address using a 220v connection with a ground wire connected to L-0. I can't find any information with respect to grounding using a 120v connection here or in the TM.

I guess I can try grounding to the frame of the generator and see what happens. If worse comes to worse, I'll be back to looking for another generator.
 

derf

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I've called myself reading all of the threads on here about proper grounding when connecting to a residential breaker panel, but it seems they all address using a 220v connection with a ground wire connected to L-0. I can't find any information with respect to grounding using a 120v connection here or in the TM.

I guess I can try grounding to the frame of the generator and see what happens. If worse comes to worse, I'll be back to looking for another generator.
I think you're mistaken about the importance of grounding. Worst case you won't be looking for a new generator. The generator might be looking for a new operator.
 

Speddmon

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No matter what configuration you use. The GROUND always goes to the split-bolt connector on the frame under the control panel.
 

Speddmon

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Don't confuse Ground with Neutral !!!

The GROUND comes from the ground rod or your home's grounding system. The Neutral wire is what completes the 120 volt circuit
 
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