What did you do to your deuce this week?

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Elijah95

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That'll work!

That pressure-treated material is saturated in arsenic chromate if I remember right, good idea to wear dust mask when you rip that stuff.

You know that, right?
You’re going to laugh here, I would hold my breath and rip half the board, then come back after some fresh air and rip the rest; I didn’t have a mask so I improvised as safe as I could
 

benhasajeep

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That'll work!

That pressure-treated material is saturated in arsenic chromate if I remember right, good idea to wear dust mask when you rip that stuff.

You know that, right?
Unless he's using wood made before Dec 2003, there is no arsenic in it. The new stuff is alkaline copper quad. It uses copper as the main treatment. And the reason you need to use a coated fastener. Any normal steel or even zinc coated fastener will rust quickly. It's the reason when you go to the home center and all the decking screws are coated and 2x more expensive than years ago.
 

emeralcove

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Ahab, you posted about the consistent twists for nice looking safety wire work, it can be done by hand but pliers like these make it much easier if your are going to be doing very much.
safety wire pliers.pngNot real expensive either but not much use for anything but their intended purpose.
 

SCM35A2

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Got a few more things done this weekend...new passenger seat-(upper/lower) installed, wiper arms/blades, Pioneer tool kit installed, new starter button & bled the brakes again & now she stops...
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Privatewrench

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Installed a 24v to 12v converter under the glove box and mounted some outlets under the dash. I put in a back up camera (front facing one too), so i need a 12v source to run the cameras. I added an on/off switch so it won't draw from the batteries when not in use.

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Nomad1

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I need to do my passenger seat someday I just put a new 41-01 on the driver side windshield.The brake thing comes in handy.The skinny pedal gets to much credit sometimes
Got a few more things done this weekend...new passenger seat-(upper/lower) installed, wiper arms/blades, Pioneer tool kit installed, new starter button & bled the brakes again & now she stops...
View attachment 774364View attachment 774365View attachment 774366View attachment 774367View attachment 774368
 

benhasajeep

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Ahab, you posted about the consistent twists for nice looking safety wire work, it can be done by hand but pliers like these make it much easier if your are going to be doing very much.
View attachment 774361Not real expensive either but not much use for anything but their intended purpose.
The chinese clones will work for most purposes. They are a bit fatter than the "name brand" ones. And they will wear out quicker. But if your not going to do a lot of safety wiring, they will work fine. If your only going to do one or two things. Just do it by hand. I'm a 25 year aircraft mechanic.
 

rustystud

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The chinese clones will work for most purposes. They are a bit fatter than the "name brand" ones. And they will wear out quicker. But if your not going to do a lot of safety wiring, they will work fine. If your only going to do one or two things. Just do it by hand. I'm a 25 year aircraft mechanic.
As a aircraft mechanic your then totally familiar with all the different types of safety wiring I'm sure ! It looks like the whole plane is safety wired together ! At one point in my career I thought about becoming an aircraft mechanic. All the safety rules you must "follow to the letter" and all the paper work and such turned me off. It was bad enough being a transit bus mechanic. I like short cuts to much I guess !
 

benhasajeep

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As a aircraft mechanic your then totally familiar with all the different types of safety wiring I'm sure ! It looks like the whole plane is safety wired together ! At one point in my career I thought about becoming an aircraft mechanic. All the safety rules you must "follow to the letter" and all the paper work and such turned me off. It was bad enough being a transit bus mechanic. I like short cuts to much I guess !
Even worse, as I have been an aircraft maintenance inspector for the last 17 years. The paperwork dotting the I's and crossing the T's gets even worse.
 

Another Ahab

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As a aircraft mechanic your then totally familiar with all the different types of safety wiring I'm sure ! It looks like the whole plane is safety wired together ! At one point in my career I thought about becoming an aircraft mechanic. All the safety rules you must "follow to the letter" and all the paper work and such turned me off. It was bad enough being a transit bus mechanic. I like short cuts to much I guess !
Even worse, as I have been an aircraft maintenance inspector for the last 17 years. The paperwork dotting the I's and crossing the T's gets even worse.
If I was a pilot, I believe I would SURE appreciate all the back-checks and rule-following by every mechanic and inspector who worked my aircraft.

You bet!
 

rustystud

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If I was a pilot, I believe I would SURE appreciate all the back-checks and rule-following by every mechanic and inspector who worked my aircraft.

You bet!
Yes, there is a reason for all the little nit picking way of doing things. I'm just not built that way. Too much of a "hippy" I guess !
Now I'm not against safety at all. I'm not saying that. I just don't want to be told "how" something must be done. You know the routine, "you must remove this item first then set aside that item here" , that kind of stuff. I look at a problem and see I can take this off and gain access to the broken part much more easily then going through the manuals procedure.
For example: we had these motor mounts that had to be replaced all on all our Breda Buses. It took 6 to 8 hours to do it according to procedure. I could do it in 45 minutes. I performed this procedure over 100 times and even showed other mechanics how to do it.
Then there was the time I replaced the faulty fuel fill valves on the first Gillig 40 footers.
According to the procedure it took 4 hours. I could do it in 1 hour. I did get into trouble for that since it was a "warranty" issue. But after the engineers looked over how I did it (took them 2 weeks !) they determined the 60 busses I had already modified where OK, but I had to perform the rest according to the original procedure ! That kind of mentality really gets to me.
 
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benhasajeep

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Yes, there is a reason for all the little nit picking way of doing things. I'm just not built that way. Too much of a "hippy" I guess !
Now I'm not against safety at all. I'm not saying that. I just don't want to be told "how" something must be done. You know the routine, "you must remove this item first then set aside that item here" , that kind of stuff. I look at a problem and see I can take this off and gain access to the broken part much more easily then going through the manuals procedure.
For example: we had these motor mounts that had to be replaced all on all our Breda Buses. It took 6 to 8 hours to do it according to procedure. I could do it in 45 minutes. I performed this procedure over 100 times and even showed other mechanics how to do it.
Then there was the time I replaced the faulty fuel fill valves on the first Gillig 40 footers.
According to the procedure it took 4 hours. I could do it in 1 hour. I did get into trouble for that since it was a "warranty" issue. But after the engineers looked over how I did it (took them 2 weeks !) they determined the 60 busses I had already modified where OK, but I had to perform the rest according to the original procedure ! That kind of mentality really gets to me.
Actually aircraft work is not nit-picky, the manuals leave a lot to desire in many cases. More people get into trouble over paperwork than how they did something. There are bad apples and don't care if they do a job right, or even just pencil whip things (like lubes). But for the most part people try. And mistakes do happen. But most get caught by inspection process or just others looking things over. Things do get missed. And the general public has no clue that a plane they are on could have dozens of things not working. And there is a process to defer some items. Every plane (airliner) has a Minimum Equipment List. And that basically tells you if the plane can be dispatched with something not working. There is no limits to MEL's on a plane. There could be 50 things or more deferred as long as the manual says they can be inoperative. And that's what mechanics are doing while the plane is boarding, and you hear a pa announcement, we are finishing up some maintenance paperwork, and yet you never saw a mechanic touch anything on the plane while it was at the gate. Unless it was something simple like a light bulb in the cockpit, there is no time between flights to fix much of anything.
 

jeffhuey1n

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I don’t know if there’s a video on YouTube but when I went to tech school in the Marine Corps, one of the first things I learned was how to properly use safety wire. You couldn’t advance through that section of training until you did it correctly using the proper size wire: .020, .032 and I think the third was .040, if I remember correctly. Once I arrived at my first duty station, my very first job was safety wiring a tail rotor hub. I got it mostly right, only had to redo one section. Bottom line, if the safety wire ain’t done right, the plane don’t fly.

There must be a learning curve to getting that wiring done right:
- Are there any good YouTubes about how you "do" that wiring?
 

benhasajeep

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I don’t know if there’s a video on YouTube but when I went to tech school in the Marine Corps, one of the first things I learned was how to properly use safety wire. You couldn’t advance through that section of training until you did it correctly using the proper size wire: .020, .032 and I think the third was .040, if I remember correctly. Once I arrived at my first duty station, my very first job was safety wiring a tail rotor hub. I got it mostly right, only had to redo one section. Bottom line, if the safety wire ain’t done right, the plane don’t fly.
There is no trick to it. Just some general rules. There are a couple techniques that help keep it to lay down and have proper tightness. But it's hard for me to describe in words. It's more of a hand movement that needs to be seen. The biggest errors I catch as an inspector is too loose, too tight, too many or too few twists, made too long and unwound to fit (big no no), or not twisted enough (twists short of the hole). Safety wire should always be pulling in the tighten direction (positive). Neutral is ok, but a negative pull is a no go.

I remember 1 mechanic who was putting boroscope plugs back into an engine. I shot his safety wiring down 3 times in a row. After the third try and turning it down ( the three tries taking an hour to this point), I even offered to do it for him. But he said no, I hate safety wiring, but I have to do it, to get better. If I had personally done what he did on the 4th attempt, I would have cut it and done it over. But what he did was legal by the general rules, and we let it go that way. But, myself I would have done it again.
 

Another Ahab

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Actually aircraft work is not nit-picky, the manuals leave a lot to desire in many cases. But for the most part people try. And mistakes do happen. But most get caught by inspection process or just others looking things over. Things do get missed.
That's normal, right?

So that's maybe why the requirements sometimes seem stupid (maybe the redundancies help offset the mistakes).

All I know is if I'm piloting a heavier-than-air craft, I sure don't want to hear that any mechanic said "oops", after I'm already airborne!!!



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