What have you done to your CUCV today/lately - Part 2

rmesgt

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My M1008 comes back from the body shop tomorrow. It got a new pax door and fender from a mishap with a red Ford Ranger. Apparently, the ranger could not see the CUCV as it has a woodland camo paint design....
 

Curtisje

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Dropped off a spare starter and 2 alternators at the local shop for rebuild on Thursday morning. Thursday afternoon the starter on my M1028A3 quit at the gas station. Had to have my wife tow my tow truck home. Karma is a #$/=$.
 

Tinstar

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It happens.

If it makes you feel any better, I had a brand new 2019 Chevrolet Malibu rental a few months ago.
It quit and wouldn’t start in the hotel parking lot.
Hertz had to send a tow truck and replacement car.

Machines will be machines
 

Another Ahab

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Dropped off a spare starter and 2 alternators at the local shop for rebuild on Thursday morning. Thursday afternoon the starter on my M1028A3 quit at the gas station. Had to have my wife tow my tow truck home. Karma is a #$/=$.
It's the worst. You do everything right and sometimes things still go wrong. Like Tinstar says, "it happens".

Cryin' won't help you/
Prayin' won't do you no good
 

emeralcove

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Rutjes, you posted "I think you guys are on to something. It IS different. One of the previous owners must have swapped the complete axle for one with different drums. Explains the faded blueish tint on the diff, doesn't look like a factory color to me.

I was near the truck today so went and got a close-up photo." a while back.

I have a 1980 K-5 Blazer in addition to my m1009 and after tearing up a couple stock rear ends years ago, I swapped out the rear diff for one off a Suburban with a full floating 14 bolt like what you have. I changed it to disc brakes with the El Dorado calipers. I will agree the calipers are a real pain to get set up and they did not work at all for a while. I finally took them apart to understand them and in my case I had them on the wrong sides of the axle so setting the brake released then and releasing the brake allowed them to try and "set" but without enough pressure to do much more than drag. Once I got it figured out and adjusted, I couldn't be happier, now when I set the brake the vehicle does not move at all, no moving an inch or so, just holds the rear wheels tight. Even on a hill they hold solid which in my case is a bigger deal as it is a manual transmission with out a parking pawl like the automatics. Also there are kits available to convert a full floating 14 bolt to disc brake AND 6 lug hubs so your front and rear wheels can be the same bolt pattern unless like mine the front axle was converted to 8 lug as well because the 6 lug hub kit wasn't available at the time I did my 1980. Regardless I hope this sheds a little light on your situation. The Suburban rear end is almost a direct bolt in except for the spring perches. The position of the perches is perfect it is the Suburban springs are too long to use on a K-5 or M1009 and the center bolt on the K-5/M1009 is too small to fit snugly in the centering hole on the 14 bolt spring perch. I just took out the springs removed the center bolt bought the correct size for the 14 bolt and re-drilled the center hole in each leaf and put the spring pack back together, then it was a bolt in conversion.

 

Rutjes

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Rutjes, you posted "I think you guys are on to something. It IS different. One of the previous owners must have swapped the complete axle for one with different drums. Explains the faded blueish tint on the diff, doesn't look like a factory color to me.

I was near the truck today so went and got a close-up photo." a while back.

I have a 1980 K-5 Blazer in addition to my m1009 and after tearing up a couple stock rear ends years ago, I swapped out the rear diff for one off a Suburban with a full floating 14 bolt like what you have. I changed it to disc brakes with the El Dorado calipers. I will agree the calipers are a real pain to get set up and they did not work at all for a while. I finally took them apart to understand them and in my case I had them on the wrong sides of the axle so setting the brake released then and releasing the brake allowed them to try and "set" but without enough pressure to do much more than drag. Once I got it figured out and adjusted, I couldn't be happier, now when I set the brake the vehicle does not move at all, no moving an inch or so, just holds the rear wheels tight. Even on a hill they hold solid which in my case is a bigger deal as it is a manual transmission with out a parking pawl like the automatics. Also there are kits available to convert a full floating 14 bolt to disc brake AND 6 lug hubs so your front and rear wheels can be the same bolt pattern unless like mine the front axle was converted to 8 lug as well because the 6 lug hub kit wasn't available at the time I did my 1980. Regardless I hope this sheds a little light on your situation. The Suburban rear end is almost a direct bolt in except for the spring perches. The position of the perches is perfect it is the Suburban springs are too long to use on a K-5 or M1009 and the center bolt on the K-5/M1009 is too small to fit snugly in the centering hole on the 14 bolt spring perch. I just took out the springs removed the center bolt bought the correct size for the 14 bolt and re-drilled the center hole in each leaf and put the spring pack back together, then it was a bolt in conversion.

Thanks for the info. Both axles are 8 lug at the moment. I'd like to keep it that way.

E-brake is a requirement over here, that's the main reason I need to have it. I don't know much about automatics, only driven them a couple of times. I have driven a half-automatic(s) for 5 years but in P they where still neutral! (Iveco Dailys)

So, stupid question; is setting it in P like parking a manual in-gear? I was thought to believe automatics are kind of fragile... At the moment I don't like using P unless it's on a flat spot. On manuals I pretty much always park it in gear tho, without handbrake. Only time I use both is when I have a (heavy/overloaded) trailer behind it on a slope (every other week with about 10 tons or 22000 lbs combined).
 

emeralcove

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Automatics have a "parking pawl" that engages the drive shaft out-put but the engine acts as if it is in neutral. If the transmission is shifted into park while moving it makes a horrible noise as the pawl tries to engage a detent and normally tears things up pretty good if it can engage while the vehicle is moving. If it isn't abused it works fine but heavy loads on a slope it can eventually cause it to bind enough that the transmission can't be shifted out of park with out a little push from another vehicle to unbind it. I had a neighbor that had a steep drive way and never used the parking brake until one day I had to push her car a little to shift it out of park. It happened several more time until they sold the car, I was getting tired of having to help so they could avoid fixing it. That was a Turbo-350, the M1009 has a Turbo 400 which is quite a bit stronger but over time it could suffer the same problem, wheel chocks and or setting the parking brake will probably avoid the problem in your case. When I have the situation you described I like to have a nice solid block to pull up to and ease into it until the load is stopped with the block, then shift into park and set the brake. That way the parking pawl isn't the only thing holding the load. Many people don't use the "parking brake" a.k.a. "e-brake" but I take the "belt and suspenders" approach to try to avoid the "oh Crap" moment when ever possible. That being said I am guilty of seriously over loading things from time to time so I guess I learn from living on the edge and try to compensate when and where I can. Parking a manual in gear uses the engine to block the drive shaft which works fine most of the time, but in my younger days I had vehicles with well worn engines that would turn over when in gear and still roll down hill because the compression would not hold the load back, also diesels like the M35A2 will start if bumped if the fuel isn't closed off completely. The 6.2 won't because the fuel is shut off with a solenoid valve in the injection pump. Sorry if I ramble on too much, I can put my wife to sleep with my long winded explanations.
 

Tinstar

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Automatics have a "parking pawl" that engages the drive shaft out-put but the engine acts as if it is in neutral. If the transmission is shifted into park while moving it makes a horrible noise as the pawl tries to engage a detent and normally tears things up pretty good if it can engage while the vehicle is moving. If it isn't abused it works fine but heavy loads on a slope it can eventually cause it to bind enough that the transmission can't be shifted out of park with out a little push from another vehicle to unbind it. I had a neighbor that had a steep drive way and never used the parking brake until one day I had to push her car a little to shift it out of park. It happened several more time until they sold the car, I was getting tired of having to help so they could avoid fixing it. That was a Turbo-350, the M1009 has a Turbo 400 which is quite a bit stronger but over time it could suffer the same problem, wheel chocks and or setting the parking brake will probably avoid the problem in your case. When I have the situation you described I like to have a nice solid block to pull up to and ease into it until the load is stopped with the block, then shift into park and set the brake. That way the parking pawl isn't the only thing holding the load. Many people don't use the "parking brake" a.k.a. "e-brake" but I take the "belt and suspenders" approach to try to avoid the "oh Crap" moment when ever possible. That being said I am guilty of seriously over loading things from time to time so I guess I learn from living on the edge and try to compensate when and where I can. Parking a manual in gear uses the engine to block the drive shaft which works fine most of the time, but in my younger days I had vehicles with well worn engines that would turn over when in gear and still roll down hill because the compression would not hold the load back, also diesels like the M35A2 will start if bumped if the fuel isn't closed off completely. The 6.2 won't because the fuel is shut off with a solenoid valve in the injection pump. Sorry if I ramble on too much, I can put my wife to sleep with my long winded explanations.
Please use paragraphs
A brick is difficult to read.
 

emeralcove

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Sorry about that, I think way faster than I can type. But if you saw how fast I type you would know I actually don't think very fast either.:? Regardless point taken!
 

Rutjes

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Automatics have a "parking pawl" that engages the drive shaft out-put but the engine acts as if it is in neutral. If the transmission is shifted into park while moving it makes a horrible noise as the pawl tries to engage a detent and normally tears things up pretty good if it can engage while the vehicle is moving. If it isn't abused it works fine but heavy loads on a slope it can eventually cause it to bind enough that the transmission can't be shifted out of park with out a little push from another vehicle to unbind it. I had a neighbor that had a steep drive way and never used the parking brake until one day I had to push her car a little to shift it out of park. It happened several more time until they sold the car, I was getting tired of having to help so they could avoid fixing it. That was a Turbo-350, the M1009 has a Turbo 400 which is quite a bit stronger but over time it could suffer the same problem, wheel chocks and or setting the parking brake will probably avoid the problem in your case. When I have the situation you described I like to have a nice solid block to pull up to and ease into it until the load is stopped with the block, then shift into park and set the brake. That way the parking pawl isn't the only thing holding the load. Many people don't use the "parking brake" a.k.a. "e-brake" but I take the "belt and suspenders" approach to try to avoid the "oh Crap" moment when ever possible. That being said I am guilty of seriously over loading things from time to time so I guess I learn from living on the edge and try to compensate when and where I can. Parking a manual in gear uses the engine to block the drive shaft which works fine most of the time, but in my younger days I had vehicles with well worn engines that would turn over when in gear and still roll down hill because the compression would not hold the load back, also diesels like the M35A2 will start if bumped if the fuel isn't closed off completely. The 6.2 won't because the fuel is shut off with a solenoid valve in the injection pump. Sorry if I ramble on too much, I can put my wife to sleep with my long winded explanations.
Thanks, that clears some things up to me. On a slope with a load I pull the e-brake first and then put it in gear so the engine/trans doesn't get strained unless the e-brake can't hold the load. That's my thinking at least...

I guess I'm like you, seriously over loading things. Not time to time, but constantly though. "Regular" trailers are allowed 3,5 tons at max over here and mine are at least 7 fully loaded. Structurally they can handle it and so can the car towing them. I could go with an air brake system, but that's a HUGE investment. Five grand for upgrading the car at least and buying new trailers... I'd guess 10000 each 2nd hand. Plus, any employees (and me) would need get a special drivers license for them, which will also run into a couple thousands per person.

In my line of work I have to have cars towed sometimes. Having cars towed costs me time and money (employees standing still). Sometimes if I see it is in gear and not on the e-brake we just push the car through the gear so we can carry on. The faces people make when they see their locked car in another location... :razz::razz::razz:

Anyway, my conclusion: The El Dorado calipers will do fine for me. Like I said, it's mostly because it is a requirement. I will only rarely use my M1028 for work. Either to show off 8), frost or snow on the roads or because my Iveco broke down. And they do. Very reliable engine, but anything other then that... crap. It is a FIAT after all... but over here it's the best for this job.

I'm in the process of getting a plastic fuel tank, straps and sending unit shipped (and just added AnttennaClimber's glow plug card and AC60Gs to the order). Next month I'll look into getting a disc brake conversion kit shipped. Trying the spread the cost... I don't have an inheritance to spent like some (one) of us...
 
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emeralcove

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Rutjes,
The hydro-boost brakes in the M1009 and the M1028 do a great job. I have no problem locking all four corners so the braking is limited by the tires and the grip they have on the road, not really by the brakes. Long down hills can heat the lining up to the point they can no longer dissipate the heat and better brake cooling and linings could be considered in that case, but keeping speeds reasonable under those conditions is the best option. I have not experienced brake problems with over heating the brakes, but I did get shoved half way thru an intersection in heavy rain because one of my rear dual tires was flat and didn't have enough grip on the road. Once the tire was repaired it was fine again.

As to the El Dorado calipers, it is my understanding the biggest problem with the self adjusting feature is NOT using them, they self adjust each time they are applied and not using them often enough will let them get too far out of adjustment for the self adjust feature to function. This requires setting them up again which is misunderstood as needing constant maintenance. I highly recommend taking the time to really understand how the mechanical feature on the brakes works so you don't have the long learning curve I did. The kit I got, included shipping which was a big deal because it is really heavy. Here the post office has a "if it fits it ships" flat rate boxes and the vendor found he could cram everything into two of these boxes and ship for a very low cost as part of the sales price. But don't expect a smile from the your local mail carrier those boxes are really heavy and they are really beat up by the time they arrive. But it is also hard to break a chunk of iron so damage wasn't an issue. I don't know how international shipping would apply on that though.
Best of luck with your project.
 

MarcusOReallyus

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Quick question that I cant seem to find an answer to. Will a 1980 civilian dash pad fit my M1008?
Your M1008 is a standard Chevy pickup, just like the ones that rolled off the assembly line and went to any Chevy dealer in the U.S. It might have been blue, green, white, or whatever. The only differences are:

  1. Paint job.
  2. Weird 24/12v start/GP system.
  3. Some combat lights.
  4. A grill guard.
  5. Funky rear bumper with a pintle hitch.
  6. Maybe some rifle racks.
  7. Possibly a mount for a CBR decontamination kit.
  8. Funny numbers painted on the bumper.
I think that's about it. In other words, if it fits a civvy truck, it fits yours.
 

Another Ahab

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Your M1008 is a standard Chevy pickup, just like the ones that rolled off the assembly line and went to any Chevy dealer in the U.S. It might have been blue, green, white, or whatever. The only differences are:

  1. Paint job.
  2. Funny numbers painted on the bumper.
I think that's about it. In other words, if it fits a civvy truck, it fits yours.
Being a taxpayer, and from what I read about Defense Procurement, maybe there was a little difference in cost also.

If there WAS any cost difference, it's a 50/50 guess who got the best deal:

- Civilian buyer, or

- The taxpayer

Anybody know?
 

emeralcove

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For basically a stripped truck they were quite expensive. But what Uncle Sam got was all the heavy duty off the shelf parts that would fit on the particular vehicle and a few items mentioned like the 24 volt/12 volt electrical system that were unique to satisfy the need to be NATO compatible for jump starting. Tax payer got the short end but then again it was less cost than a purpose built vehicle which eventually they got with the Humvee. So many ways to look at it, good, bad, all depends on your point of view. It was an interesting experiment that was neither an out right success nor a complete failure, but in the end it provided some fun toys at a reasonable cost for all of us.
 

D6T

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For basically a stripped truck they were quite expensive. But what Uncle Sam got was all the heavy duty off the shelf parts that would fit on the particular vehicle and a few items mentioned like the 24 volt/12 volt electrical system that were unique to satisfy the need to be NATO compatible for jump starting. Tax payer got the short end but then again it was less cost than a purpose built vehicle which eventually they got with the Humvee. So many ways to look at it, good, bad, all depends on your point of view. It was an interesting experiment that was neither an out right success nor a complete failure, but in the end it provided some fun toys at a reasonable cost for all of us.
Very well-said!!!
 

chevymike

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Finally got some free time to do some work on the 1010. Wanted to upgrade my headlights and headlight harness. Have new E-code style H4 headlights (Autopal ones, I have used in a half dozen vehicles). I wanted to install a new headlight harness that uses relays to control the lights, so they get power directly from the battery. End up brighter and takes all of the load off the headlight switch as it only triggers the relays now. That went in easily but I had to order new headlight retainer rings as the ones were missing tabs to hold the lights, so I couldn't finish installing the lights.

While I had the grill out to run the harness, I tested the horn and found it to be dead. I happened to have a set of hi/lo horns laying around and installed them. They work great and you can't see the red back when looking through the grill. Forgot to get pics while the grill was out.

Then I needed to change out the transmission mounts. OMG I have never changed a set that was so bad. They had expanded with oil/trans fluid over the last 35 years and felt like squishy Jello. Put a new set in from NAPA and much better. That was it for my work yesterday.
 

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Another Ahab

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I wanted to install a new headlight harness that uses relays to control the lights, so they get power directly from the battery. End up brighter and takes all of the load off the headlight switch as it only triggers the relays now. That went in easily but I had to order new headlight retainer rings as the ones were missing tabs to hold the lights, so I couldn't finish installing the lights.
No electrical expertise here, but can you explain why a 1) relay is a better alternative to a 2) switch?

If there is no simple explanation, I'll get it, but hoping maybe that there is.

Is it simple?
 
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