Winter storage tips?

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HDN

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It's going to snow here within the next few days, and when the salt hits the road, the truck is parked for the winter. Unfortunately, my new house doesn't have a treeless spot in the yard to park it. My biggest concern is branches coming down and damaging the soft cab and cargo covers.

So here I am looking for ideas. It's too late in the year for me to build a hard shelter for it. Should I take the cargo cover, bows and side racks off for the winter? Would a blue tarp from Tractor Supply over the back of the truck and the cab help protect against some branches? What are your thoughts?
 

Another Ahab

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I get an agricultural catalog in the mail kind of regularly that has a variety of "pop-up" shelters for farm equipment.

If I can remember the name of it, i'll post a link here in a post or two.

It might give you some ideas....
 

Another Ahab

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davidb56

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I took the cargo cover and bows off mine, then I have two 2k pound retaining wall blocks put in the back for traction (55$ each). In your case, you could buy a sheet of plywood and screw some 2x4 stiffeners under it, then a couple of 2x4 uprights down to the steps tp protect the cab soft top. I have a hard top and winter is when my truck gets the most use.
 

Another Ahab

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I took the cargo cover and bows off mine, then I have two 2k pound retaining wall blocks put in the back for traction (55$ each). In your case, you could buy a sheet of plywood and screw some 2x4 stiffeners under it, then a couple of 2x4 uprights down to the steps tp protect the cab soft top. I have a hard top and winter is when my truck gets the most use.
Just curious, davidb56:

- How did you hump those suckers up there into the bed?!
 
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HDN

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This is not from the catalog I mentioned, but same kind of idea:

- And only $450

I might need to think of one of these for myself!


https://www.doversaddlery.com/1-58-stl-frm-corral-shelter/p/X1-270080/?gclid=Cj0KCQiA-4nuBRCnARIsAHwyuPp4d0MNBwk8aMZrhwIXHW6sNSOZtajG0UuNmiwlb5c91_ZoeTYQDdkaAtTyEALw_wcB
Not sure you noticed, but that $450 is for the roof and frame only. I'd have to find something to build it up on, like old corral rails. I was considering a home-built PVC structure covered with a tarp or two. With moving in and the weather getting crappy, though, I'm not sure I'll have time to build it.

I might just take the top and bows off for this winter and use next spring to build something more elaborate.
 

Ajax MD

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Not sure you noticed, but that $450 is for the roof and frame only. I'd have to find something to build it up on, like old corral rails. I was considering a home-built PVC structure covered with a tarp or two. With moving in and the weather getting crappy, though, I'm not sure I'll have time to build it.

I might just take the top and bows off for this winter and use next spring to build something more elaborate.
Don't you endure a great deal of snow in Finger Lakes? I feel like PVC would not provide enough support under the weight of snow unless you built a very steeply angled roof.
I've built snow tarp frames out of it for my boat and it never held up.

It sounds like you're busy with moving households, so I'd remove the bows and cover and store them indoors and find a way to tie a line above the cab to make a steep tarp tent that would shed snow.
As Flyingvan says, put some anti-gel or Stanadyne in your tank because unforeseen circumstances may require you to start and move the truck during the winter even though you didn't plan on it. (Trees falling, etc)

When time and money permits, maybe one of those shelters and a block heater.

I think you're missing out, not driving the truck in the snowy winter. Just hose off the chassis after driving it. ;)
 

frank8003

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"I think you're missing out, not driving the truck in the snowy winter.
Just hose off the chassis after driving it."


You and your tactical military vehicle are not going to last forever.
 

DeadParrot

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I would take the cargo cover off. Avoids the possibility of snow fall partially melting and creating a low spot that keeps growing and getting heavier.

A simple temporary solution for the cab is lay a 4x8 sheet of plywood/osb over the cab and secure in place.

Make sure you park the truck within easy extension cord range so you can charge the batteries.
 

montaillou

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You'll probably go through a couple blue tarps per winter - I switched to white tarps, they're about twice as thick but not twice as expensive. Does anyone use canvas tarps? I would think they would hold up better to the elements, but have never tested one.
Instead of pvc, you could just build one out of pipes and plumbing fittings, maybe just a box frame around the cab, one side higher than the other so snow falls off the slope of the tarp.
 

HDN

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Maybe some day I'll go for a snow romp. I used to do that with my 1999 Wrangler before its rusty, 210k mile frame about split in two! Actually, driving this truck reminds me so much of my old jeep other than the automatic transmission.

Thank you for the tip about the diesel fuel additive. This is my first diesel, so I'm not entirely up to snuff for winter care for these things.

And that's a good point with the bed cover. I haven't thought of snow buildup on it.
 

davidb56

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@ Ahab.....the concrete plant that sells them does it. getting them out is going to be a issue. My neighbor ( 1/2 mile away) can do it with his tractor. My tractor cant lift them.
 

rustystud

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You'll probably go through a couple blue tarps per winter - I switched to white tarps, they're about twice as thick but not twice as expensive. Does anyone use canvas tarps? I would think they would hold up better to the elements, but have never tested one.
Instead of pvc, you could just build one out of pipes and plumbing fittings, maybe just a box frame around the cab, one side higher than the other so snow falls off the slope of the tarp.
Canvas tarps are fare superior to PVC in strength, but the elements destroy them pretty fast. Especially here in the wet Pacific Northwest. I had one that only lasted two years then "rotted" away. I suppose you can put on one of those additives that helps preserve the canvas, but I have found they usually smell pretty bad !
 

cattlerepairman

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FWIW, my Deuce spent its life in the salt-free southern US and I am not going to introduce it to stone salt and calcium chloride liquid that are used around here for snow and ice removal. That sh*t eats your car alive. Mine goes into heated storage next week.....costs money, yes, but so does cutting out rust, fixing rust and throwing stuff away because of rust.
 

Ajax MD

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FWIW, my Deuce spent its life in the salt-free southern US and I am not going to introduce it to stone salt and calcium chloride liquid that are used around here for snow and ice removal. That sh*t eats your car alive. Mine goes into heated storage next week.....costs money, yes, but so does cutting out rust, fixing rust and throwing stuff away because of rust.
Now that's love.
 

davidb56

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Thats what I was thinking, but it would be outside and made of 6 in steel pipe casing, because I don't have a "inside". In fact, I don't have a slab either, so when it rains, I use a 1 inch thick sheet of plywood treated with used diesel engine oil (really) and when it snows, I use cardboard. Its a good thing it doesn't get below -10F often.
 
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