Winter storage tips?

Steel Soldiers is supported by:

davidb56

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
480
84
28
Location
Bonners Ferry Idaho
Davidb56 - How are you tying down the blocks? I'm considering two IBC totes full of water for some weight so I can load and unload them myself. The cargo tie downs don't look like they could take the load but I may be wrong.
I set them on a 4'x6' x 1'' thick rubber horse stall mat. the floor anchors work fine (for legalities) as it real doesn't go anywhere. Those totes will work good too as soon as the water freezes inside. I suppose if you didn't want to use the mats, you could frame it in the bed with a half dozen 2x6 boards edge up.
 

Karl kostman

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
1,941
44
48
Location
Fargo ND
I have a 6000 sq ft warehouse that I store all my trucks in over the winter, concrete floors but no heat. All the trucks have trickle 2 amp chargers on the batteries and that all seems to work very well! One thing I used to do was to go out therre at least once a winter and start each truck and let it run for 20 minutes or so just to keep things lubricated, I would spend 2 full days if everything went smoothly preheating the engines with a tarp and a nipco heater with this tarp draped over the engine and 30 minutes of heat the trucks would usually start up pretty good. WHAT A STUPID IDEA!!! After doing this for a couple years I sat down and gave it some thought about what am I accomplishing here? I work my ass off to get a frozen truck started to let it run for 20 minutes and generate zero heat in the engine and heaven know how much condensation I am building in the oil doing this and I waste at least 2 full days in freezing weather to get it done, when in reality I am doing more harm than good by a long ways! My trucks get put away now and they are sound asleep till its warm enough to fire them up in the Spring! I live in ND and we get lots of salt on the roads I dont care how much you wash the underside of the truck you not going to get all the salt off, especially when it -10 when your trying to do the washing! Some may not agree with this but I know this works a whole lot better for me and the trucks seem not to mind a bit!
Karl
 

Another Ahab

Well-known member
15,990
191
63
Location
Alexandria, VA
The Russians get some mighty big winters, wonder what their experience is over there.

Don't know that they salt their roads, though.

Wish USSR was following the thread, he might have something to say.
 

HDN

Active member
162
53
28
Location
Finger Lakes, NY
I almost bought a house with a 5000 sf shop, but the doors wouldn't have been tall enough for my deuce unless I put the windshield down and towed it inside with a tractor! I hope to build a barn of sorts in the next couple years to store the truck and a future camper.

Considering the inch of snow we got here over the past day and a half and the accompanying mid-20s cold snap, there isn't much evidence of salt trucks being out, so I think I'm good for at least one more trip to the new house and park it for the season if I so desire. Maybe I'll hose the underside down before that. It's supposed to be in the low 40s this weekend so I don't anticipate freezing issues.

I thought a bit more about the fuel/oil underside spray and wonder where that stuff will drip. My new home is on a well (like my old home) and I don't want that stuff leeching into my ground water, or kill my grass!
 

rustystud

Well-known member
8,487
101
48
Location
Woodinville, Washington
I have a 6000 sq ft warehouse that I store all my trucks in over the winter, concrete floors but no heat. All the trucks have trickle 2 amp chargers on the batteries and that all seems to work very well! One thing I used to do was to go out therre at least once a winter and start each truck and let it run for 20 minutes or so just to keep things lubricated, I would spend 2 full days if everything went smoothly preheating the engines with a tarp and a nipco heater with this tarp draped over the engine and 30 minutes of heat the trucks would usually start up pretty good. WHAT A STUPID IDEA!!! After doing this for a couple years I sat down and gave it some thought about what am I accomplishing here? I work my ass off to get a frozen truck started to let it run for 20 minutes and generate zero heat in the engine and heaven know how much condensation I am building in the oil doing this and I waste at least 2 full days in freezing weather to get it done, when in reality I am doing more harm than good by a long ways! My trucks get put away now and they are sound asleep till its warm enough to fire them up in the Spring! I live in ND and we get lots of salt on the roads I dont care how much you wash the underside of the truck you not going to get all the salt off, especially when it -10 when your trying to do the washing! Some may not agree with this but I know this works a whole lot better for me and the trucks seem not to mind a bit!
Karl
Yep. The best thing for long term storage, especially in winter is of course to treat the fuel. Let the engine run until the treated fuel goes through the whole system then shut it down. The next thing to do is remove the injectors and pour some good oil down each hole. Replace the injectors but don't tighten them down. You will need to remove them before starting the engine back up in the spring. Next jack up the truck with jack-stands under the frame (not the axles) so that the axles are hanging free. This helps the springs along with helping the tires. The last thing you should do is bleed the brakes just a bit to remove any water build up in the lines. In any Silicone based brake system the water tends to go to the lowest spot which usually is the wheel cylinders.
Of course you should have already checked the anti-freeze before shutting down the engine and checked the batteries water level. Then put a good trickle charger on the batteries. If I keep a truck in a "Non" heated shop I also put a heater in the cab. One with a good thermostat to control the temperature.
This should keep any truck safely through the winter and beyond.

Now if your keeping the truck in storage for a few years you should also loosen the rocker arms to allow the engine valves to fully close. This will really help in keeping out any rust in the cylinders. Then disconnect the batteries, but leave the chargers on them.
Also put some rat killer in and under the cab and body.
 

davidb56

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
480
84
28
Location
Bonners Ferry Idaho
@ Rusty...How do you feel about just driving the piss out of it 3-4 times a week like I do. I NEED it in the winter. It has a block heater, Haldex 24vdc air dryer (your recommendation), #1 fuel mix, re routed cab heater intake, tire chains, LED lights including trans operated back up light, 4000lb concrete bed weight, and a 3000wt aux generator in the bed for my emergency 120vac cab heater for when a sissy rides with me. Last thing on my list is a 28vdc jumper gen-set. If I had to Park it for the winter, Id sell it and get a Harley. Its a d*** 6x6, not a Siver Cloud eye candy.
 

exhogflyer

Member
106
10
18
Location
Albany NY
Karl is correct, you're doing more harm than good by occasional startups. IF you are going to start it then by all means drive it 20 miles otherwise simply leave it. Add some antigel OR about a half gallon of gas per tank, leave battery tenders on and PUT MOUSETRAPS INSIDE or they'll chew on fun stuff like wires, hoses and canvas. Remember, when they were working vehicles they were rarely garaged.
 

Nomad1

Member
177
2
18
Location
Conway NH
For the most part I gree with you but, mine sat outside all winter and I moved it around on occasionally to clean up the snow around it a little better. The multifuel starts up no heat needed if setup right fuel and oil wise. I live in northern NH and it only stay in the negtives for a whole 24hrs handful of days year .So just don't start it on the those days.
I have a 6000 sq ft warehouse that I store all my trucks in over the winter, concrete floors but no heat. All the trucks have trickle 2 amp chargers on the batteries and that all seems to work very well! One thing I used to do was to go out therre at least once a winter and start each truck and let it run for 20 minutes or so just to keep things lubricated, I would spend 2 full days if everything went smoothly preheating the engines with a tarp and a nipco heater with this tarp draped over the engine and 30 minutes of heat the trucks would usually start up pretty good. WHAT A STUPID IDEA!!! After doing this for a couple years I sat down and gave it some thought about what am I accomplishing here? I work my ass off to get a frozen truck started to let it run for 20 minutes and generate zero heat in the engine and heaven know how much condensation I am building in the oil doing this and I waste at least 2 full days in freezing weather to get it done, when in reality I am doing more harm than good by a long ways! My trucks get put away now and they are sound asleep till its warm enough to fire them up in the Spring! I live in ND and we get lots of salt on the roads I dont care how much you wash the underside of the truck you not going to get all the salt off, especially when it -10 when your trying to do the washing! Some may not agree with this but I know this works a whole lot better for me and the trucks seem not to mind a bit!
Karl
 

Nomad1

Member
177
2
18
Location
Conway NH
Ahab mention about that porta garage type thing. A full porta garage that is snow rated will work good but keep in mind it has to be about 24 feet long and have a door opening 8 foot plus height wise and be wider for the mirriors to fit in. Remember I'm talking talking doorway not overall. so probably more like $1500 but then you could work in there hmmm...
 

frank8003

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
4,140
261
83
Location
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Oh Yeah, I am going to put flammable oil soaked wood all over a truck.
The MSDS on all that in centisokes and flammability is listed.
Chain oil is 99.8% oil that is viscous without the motor protection stuff.

One must exercise the brakes even when in storage or one gets to fix it all... put service air to right rear glad hand and exercise the brakes.

I have real mil spec canvas tarps here for sale thinking of listing for cheap. (shipping killer at 65 pounds)
For weather protection One just takes the POS plastic crap and covers up the good canvas stuff, much cheaper that way, Real tarps last for long time GI.
Even hurricanes didn't hurt my stuff.
IMG_2383.jpg

IMG_2861.jpg

IMG_4236.jpg

matthew 10062016 IMG_0480.jpg
 

frank8003

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
4,140
261
83
Location
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Thats worth a whole lot of money! I had a 47 Chief when I was young...sold it for 800$....probablyworth 38000$ if restored. BTW off topic, but a guy up here rides a Ural side hack with 2wd here during the winter...he has studded dirt bike tires on it.
If I had NOW, unrestored or not, all the stuff I used to have, I would be a very rich man but now I wouldn't sell it.
54 XK120; Sunbeam Tiger; endless 55 Chevies, Triumphs, VW Sunbugs, Jag engines; Well you get the idea.
And none of that compares with the girls.
 

Nomad1

Member
177
2
18
Location
Conway NH
WOOL even insulates when wet and some of it can even be machine washed regulates tempature and there is even kinds that doesn't itch. Who would have thought it God makes the best stuff:shrugs:
View attachment 782263@ fpchief....Im originally from Stockton Ca. 100F+ temps often during the summer. It only takes a couple of winters to acclimate. Plus, with all those new fangled expensive gortex+ clothing out there, remember, its all junk. Wool is still King of the cold. Also cold winters acts like our own "border wall"!
 

rustystud

Well-known member
8,487
101
48
Location
Woodinville, Washington
@ Rusty...How do you feel about just driving the piss out of it 3-4 times a week like I do. I NEED it in the winter. It has a block heater, Haldex 24vdc air dryer (your recommendation), #1 fuel mix, re routed cab heater intake, tire chains, LED lights including trans operated back up light, 4000lb concrete bed weight, and a 3000wt aux generator in the bed for my emergency 120vac cab heater for when a sissy rides with me. Last thing on my list is a 28vdc jumper gen-set. If I had to Park it for the winter, Id sell it and get a Harley. Its a d*** 6x6, not a Siver Cloud eye candy.
Yes I know YOU drive your Deuce, but for those who like to store it through winter my suggestions are mostly from the military's own manual for long term storage.
 

HDN

Active member
162
53
28
Location
Finger Lakes, NY
My truck is parked for the winter now. It turns out the stone parking area at the new house allows me to position the truck in a way to minimize the likelihood of tree branches coming down on top of it, while allowing me to park a daily driver on either side of it.

I still plan to tarp the cab, and add the anti-gel and... fungicide? to the fuel tank. I have a list of things to do with it next spring to get it in tiptop shape.
 
Last edited:

frank8003

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
4,140
261
83
Location
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Think that the original military multifuel design is to have ALL the lube oil drain to the crankcase when shutdown to ease restarting in frigid temperatures. It was designed a a tactical military vehicle for service, even in the arctic. That is why we put the modification of oil filters with anti-drain-back feature.
Just a thought.
 
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website like our supporting vendors. Their ads help keep Steel Soldiers going. Please consider disabling your ad blockers for the site. Thanks!

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks