WWII Internationals

truckdoctor

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I am interested in learning more about the International CCKW trucks but I don't know where to start. What were the truck designations for International, what sizes were most common, and what was their popularity? I have seen a few come up for sale and would like to build one but I would also like to know what I am getting into before I take that plunge. If anyone has some information or literature on them I would like to read it so I could be more informed about these trucks. Thanks
 

NDT

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The Internationals were not called CCKW, that is a General Motors model code. The WWII tactical Intl's came in 1/2 ton 4x4 (M-1-4), 1 ton 4x4 (M-2-4), 1 1/2 ton 4x4 (M-3-4), and 2 1/2 ton 6x6 (M-5-6). I think the M-1-4's and the M-5-6's are the most common. They are found on the west coast mostly. They are very heavily built of all International components. Parts can be a huge challenge to find. They come up for sale occasionally in the Military Vehicles and Supply Line magazines. Rough ones are out there waiting for you to save them . . .
 

emr

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You just got a good start from NDT, Now google it, Thats where U will find alot of the info U need, This site is much more of the M series... collector, restorer, modifier,... The MVPA is where U want to find like minded collectors and get into it, The best way to learn is to buy one, thats what I did with my first m35 then my 352cckw, figured there is really only one way to learn... buy it and drive it and fix it, U can read all u want , but untill U take the plunge its all foreplay. But really U need to know more about ww2 trucks than U do now, U do know they are double clutchers I am sure, and are not highway drivers by any stretch, they are alot of work, and it is all good, but be ready is all I am saying, There is so much to know about these trucks it will take awhile, there is so much history, who used them what service, what countries, They were very very robust vehicles for there time for sure, just reading one thing will never do it. Do U have any military vehicle experience? These are tactical vehicles, All the best good luck, they are for sale right now in the classifieds in the MV Mag...check em out...
 

paulfarber

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IHs went to Russia mainly. Finding then in the USA is rare and I while I have seen a few go by, they have not garnered much interest.

Historically, they played a tiny role in the US Military. Russia and Australia is were most of them seem to be... IIRC there are at least 50 running IHs in Australia.

Check in the 2.5 tons and up forum on G503.com is Military Vehicles, The WWII Military Jeep, Parts, Olive Drab and All Related Things..

You didn't say what you wanted one for but if your interest is in US Army then IH is not a real good starting point.
 

waayfast

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Hood hinged down the middle with 24 louvers per side,Hendrickson Walking beam rear suspension,Better off road capabilities than the "other" 2-1/2 ton trucks of the time,not many around and no website for support,parts very hard to obtain and because of that, not real popular.
MV no-man's land but hey we need a challenge right?!:twisted:
 

CatMan

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WWII IHC Trucks

Actually, the US Navy and USMC had most of the 2 1/2 ton IHC trucks. The US ARMY got the GMC CCKW's and the lend lease trucks that went to Russia and Australia were mainly Studebakers.

The IHC trucks were well liked because they were a bit heavier built than the GMC and Studebaker cousins.

There is almost nothing common between them except a few electrical parts.

There are two cab configurations on the 2 1/2 ton IHC M-5-6. Earlier closed cab and later open cab types. I'm a fan of the open cab trucks.

There are a few restored examples. The French contingent on the MVPA Coast to Coast convoy last summer imported and drove an M-2-4 IHC across the US. They were in front of us in the convoy for two weeks. They had some fuel supply issues but made the whole trip.

Neat trucks. Restoration is not for the faint hearted. Parts are hard to come by. But I think worth the effort.

Cat Man
 

68t

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Michie, ,tn
i got a 1943 IHC m426 5 ton tractor or semi. they made 15 thousand of them. i found a fuel tanker and the 8 ton trailer to pull. so i like the ihc but parts can be a problem. but the gmc cckw will cost a lot of money also to restore. so if you can find one all ready restored , and at a good price buy one. well any of this hobbie is all about money any way., no mon no fun, i dont have no mon either. i got about 15 hundred in my 5 ton but a lot of work. also about 25 hundred in a halftrack , so if you can do your own work it will pay off.
 

paulfarber

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"Not to be confused with the M-5H-6 trucks, exclusively fabricated for and used by the USN and USMC, some 3,500 M-5-6 trucks were produced by International Harvester on a Quartermaster Corps foreign aid order from 1941 on, the main recipient being the Soviet Union.
Though the majority was of the 6x4 type with 3,000 pieces, the vehicle shown here is one out of 500 M-5-6 produced."

So without knowing the exact IH model, its could go either way.

If its an M-5-6 then having one of only 3,500 produced is a definite negative. I don't know what the production of the M-5H-6 was... but I'm sure google does,.
 
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truckdoctor

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There is a few for sale on the west coast. The ones I have found are all on craigslist. There is a 1936 in Portland Oregon, there is a 1941 in Big bear Ca., there is one in Klamath Falls Oregon, and there is a hotrodded one in Prescott Arizona. They seem to pop up so hopefully a decent one will be easier to find.
http://http://inlandempire.craigslist.org/pts/1451238969.html
http://http://portland.craigslist.org/mlt/cto/1466494852.html
http://http://reno.craigslist.org/cto/1453226819.html
http://http://prescott.craigslist.org/cto/1452972444.html
 

swordmd

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You can look closer to home for one. Fallon NAS sold many a time a go. Three weeks a go I found a M5-6 Dump in Carvers NV, M5-6 Cargo in Ely NV, M5-6 Dump in Austin NV( I am picking this one up in a week or two) Two M2-4s in Eureka NV, M5-6 Winnemucca NV, and many more in NV. Nevada is the land of the lost for old MV's A great state.
 

truckdoctor

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I guess I better open my eyes. Most of those are at my back door. I'm a little more familiar with the old stuff by where you live because I grew up there and I remember the spud farmers used the WWII stuff for hauling spuds. My dad actually bought an old Jimmy that had the fiberglass roof and hood installed on it. It had a blown up small block in it when we got it. It sat at our shop for years until my dad gave his farm to the bank and it was auctioned off with everything else. Are any of the trucks you looked at in decent shape? I might be headed for Idaho soon and wouldn't mind looking at them if possible.
 
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chesnimnus

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M-5h-6

The one in Klamath Falls will be going home with me. :-D

Parts are readily available, as long as you are talking about the mechanical parts. The Red Diamond engines were used through the 1970s, and shared with the civilian trucks. The Blue Diamonds to a lesser extent. The Green Diamonds are harder, but still not that hard. Local engine shop near me rebuilds a couple a year.

The drivetrain components were usually shared with the civvie trucks, which makes obtaining parts easier. The rear brakes cylinders are not usually available, as they were special. Usually you have to sleeve them to get the old ones to work.

The winches were made by Tulsa, Heil, and I believe one other company. Tulsa still makes the same winches, and parts are a phone call away at the local Tulsa dealer.

Bodies were made by Anthony, Heil, Tulsa, and Garwood. The Tulsa oilfield body with the gin poles is actually still made, so you could just order a new one if you wanted. The others are extremely hard to find. In fact, you normally find a body and then just buy a truck to fit it. However, if you don't care about originality, then it really doesn't matter. If you are patient, you can build one by measuring an original and cutting and welding the pieces. That hinges on knowing someone with an original body.

The open cabs are hard to find some parts for, such as the top bows, doors, and windshield brackets. I am working on getting the windshield frames repopped by a company that does that type of thing. If you want a closed cab on an M-5H-6, you can use a K/KB-5 cab or larger. Those can still be found.
 

chesnimnus

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For those that are interested, books are becoming more readily available for the old IHC units. Here is a link to a listing of currently available parts, maintenance, and operations books, printed by Binder Books. More will be added in the next couple months.

http://www.binderplanet.com/forums/showthread.php?t=94931
 

chesnimnus

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For those that are interested, books are becoming more readily available for the old IHC units. Here is a link to a listing of currently available parts, maintenance, and operations books, printed by Binder Books. More will be added in the next couple months.

http://www.binderplanet.com/forums/showthread.php?t=94931
 

atankersdad

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I just love my M-2-4. These are without a doubt the least documented WWII truck that the military ever used. I just spoke with a fellow owner at the MTA show last week and we are trying to get 4 east coast trucks together at one time for Aberdeen. I have attached a picture of a Iwo Jima M-2-4 rocket truck.
 

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Here is the 1 1/2 ton that I am going to begin restoring. The International Harvesters are hard to come by, parts are rare and expensive, but they will pull through the toughest of conditions-

Well worth the effort-
 

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lunchbox005

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bakersfield, California
i have a 1957 international navy department s120 truck. im trading it for a international m-2-4 Duely. and i have another m-2-4 that will be donated to a musem and i get to gut that truck for spare parts because they only want the body for their collection. do you think this is a good trade??? please let me know. thanks!
 
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