FLU419 SEE HMMH HME Owners group

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The FLU farm

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The actual midwest, NM.
I bought a used 12-inch bucket for a 580 for one of mine. The geometry isn't exactly the same so it won't quite fold up like it's supposed to, but that doesn't matter to me.

Anyway, you can find aftermarket buckets and used ones on eBay or Craigslist, for example. The pins are standard issue, so those you should be able to get just about anywhere.
 

rtrask

Active member
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Location
Littleton, Colorado
While crawling around under my SEE, I discovered a steady stream of what I believe is hydraulic oil running down the rear drive shaft cover. I have been hunting for the source but can't seem to locate it. As fast as the oil is flowing, it should not be that hard to find. It seems to start under the front mounting bracket and above that everything is dry. There is nothing obviously dripping Any Ideas?

I believe I have found the source of the leak. It was hydraulic fluid, but Dot 5 break fluid not AW32. This also explains why the reservoir over the clutch master keeps going down. I was surprised that only the reservoir over the clutch was going down so I thought for sure that leak was something to do with the clutch.

I am going to replace both the metal brake line (19) and the rubber hose connector (21). I can't tell which is leaking, but the rubber hose is badly weather checked, and the metal brake line was put under a lot of stress while attempting to get the fitting loose, and seems like it is may be marginal / the source of the leak anyway. I ordered the hose from EI. But did not ordered the 6mm copper nickle line from them as they are really proud of what they have.


rearBrakelines.jpg
 

rtrask

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Location
Littleton, Colorado
Pardon the long introduction,

I have contracted a driver to haul the SEE to my property in south central Colorado, and of course now I am finding all kinds of issues. I have resolved them all, except the reservoir mounted on the clutch master cylinder has had a slow steady loss of fluid that has steadily been getting worse. I initially thought that the leak was the where the reservoir mounted, because the hole where it mounted seemed to have problems so I replaced the reservoir. Then I thought it was the clutch master cylinder itself, because there was a fair amount of oil in the cab. There may have been issues with one or both of those, but the leak continued to get worse. I thought I had finally found it in my previous post, and the video before that which shows oil running down the rear dive shaft cover. I replaced the line, and the hose it attached to. and got ready to bleed the breaks with the system under ~ 20 lbs of pressure I found a new leak.


As you can see when under pressure it is pouring that dot 5 out at an alarming rate. Worse yet, the line that it is coming from is fairly well buried under the cab. I don't think I can replace that line with out tipping the cab, and by my self that will take too long. The driver will be here to pick it up Saturday. Right now there is nothing other than a water well and some dreams out on the land I am taking it to. I have already paid the money to uship and I need to get it out there where it can be of some use so I am disinclined to cancel the shipment. Which brings me to the reason for this post.
  1. The hand brake is working well, so like FLU Farm said of a previous post brakes are overrated. What has got to work though is the clutch. I suspect that will stop working with an empty reservoir sitting on top of the clutch master cylinder. I have been thinking about either putting a valve in the line going to the master brake cylinder, or in some way plugging it. What do you all think of this idea?
  2. Other than not having hydraulic brakes for a while, am I overlooking something important with leaving the brakes in this inoperable state?
  3. Have any of you tried to tip the cab in the field? I have been through the process in the past. The biggest issue will be removing the FOD without a suitable rafter, tree, or sky hook. I think it was Speedwoble that showed how to remove the FOD with the backhoe, but have not found the post, and I am not sure how it would be to put back on once removed.
  4. Do any of you have a better solution for me? I am 95% certain it is not the hose that is leaking, but the galvanized steel brake line. I have thought about cleaning it really well and using an epoxy like liquid steel, but suspect that would be wasted effort.
  5. Lastly, I know that there is no definitive answer for this, but in ya'lls opinion since I have found 2 failed steel brake lines already, should I resign myself to replacing them all when I do get after it? I realize that these leaks could be the result of putting pressure on the hydraulic break system. But I have done my best to never over pressurize it and that is beside the point now.
Thanks in advance.
 

Speedwoble

Active member
461
66
28
Location
New Holland, PA
Pardon the long introduction,

I have contracted a driver to haul the SEE to my property in south central Colorado, and of course now I am finding all kinds of issues. I have resolved them all, except the reservoir mounted on the clutch master cylinder has had a slow steady loss of fluid that has steadily been getting worse. I initially thought that the leak was the where the reservoir mounted, because the hole where it mounted seemed to have problems so I replaced the reservoir. Then I thought it was the clutch master cylinder itself, because there was a fair amount of oil in the cab. There may have been issues with one or both of those, but the leak continued to get worse. I thought I had finally found it in my previous post, and the video before that which shows oil running down the rear dive shaft cover. I replaced the line, and the hose it attached to. and got ready to bleed the breaks with the system under ~ 20 lbs of pressure I found a new leak.


As you can see when under pressure it is pouring that dot 5 out at an alarming rate. Worse yet, the line that it is coming from is fairly well buried under the cab. I don't think I can replace that line with out tipping the cab, and by my self that will take too long. The driver will be here to pick it up Saturday. Right now there is nothing other than a water well and some dreams out on the land I am taking it to. I have already paid the money to uship and I need to get it out there where it can be of some use so I am disinclined to cancel the shipment. Which brings me to the reason for this post.
  1. The hand brake is working well, so like FLU Farm said of a previous post brakes are overrated. What has got to work though is the clutch. I suspect that will stop working with an empty reservoir sitting on top of the clutch master cylinder. I have been thinking about either putting a valve in the line going to the master brake cylinder, or in some way plugging it. What do you all think of this idea?
  2. Other than not having hydraulic brakes for a while, am I overlooking something important with leaving the brakes in this inoperable state?
  3. Have any of you tried to tip the cab in the field? I have been through the process in the past. The biggest issue will be removing the FOD without a suitable rafter, tree, or sky hook. I think it was Speedwoble that showed how to remove the FOD with the backhoe, but have not found the post, and I am not sure how it would be to put back on once removed.
  4. Do any of you have a better solution for me? I am 95% certain it is not the hose that is leaking, but the galvanized steel brake line. I have thought about cleaning it really well and using an epoxy like liquid steel, but suspect that would be wasted effort.
  5. Lastly, I know that there is no definitive answer for this, but in ya'lls opinion since I have found 2 failed steel brake lines already, should I resign myself to replacing them all when I do get after it? I realize that these leaks could be the result of putting pressure on the hydraulic break system. But I have done my best to never over pressurize it and that is beside the point now.
Thanks in advance.
You don’t have to run a replacement line exactly where the original ran. Run it from where you can reach to where you can reach. I am a huge fan of copper nickel line as it is so flexible and easy to run.
I once used a couple of compression fittings and a grease gun hose to splice the failed line on a hydraulic clutch. That had a lower risk of failure occurred.
I would encourage a proper fix because someday you will sell it and any field repair will be liable to fail, unexpectedly, on them.
 

rtrask

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
248
48
28
Location
Littleton, Colorado
You don’t have to run a replacement line exactly where the original ran. Run it from where you can reach to where you can reach. I am a huge fan of copper nickel line as it is so flexible and easy to run.
I once used a couple of compression fittings and a grease gun hose to splice the failed line on a hydraulic clutch. That had a lower risk of failure occurred.
I would encourage a proper fix because someday you will sell it and any field repair will be liable to fail, unexpectedly, on them.
Thanks Speedwoble, you always give good advice.

I have no intention of selling my SEE in the foreseeable future, nor do I plan on not fixing it. The problem is I don't really have time to fix it correctly before the move. My plan is to build a house and retire on the property I am moving the SEE to. As time allows I will fix it. I already have the copper nickle line to do it with.

You bring up a good point that I don't have to run the brake line in the same track as the original, so maybe I don't have to tip the cab. I just don't think I can get the fix done before I ship it this Saturday, and I am afraid that once I fix that leak I will find another, and another.... When I got my SEE the caps were missing off the reservoirs I suspect that water got in the lines, it certainly was in the master brake cylinder. I don't know, maybe that is far fetched, but 2 of the steel lines have failed on me that I know of. If I do tip the cab, will probably replace the rest with copper nickle just as a preventative measure, or at least the ones under the cab.

There is no grid power where I am moving it to, but I have bought a decent generator, so I can haul my compressor out so I can use my impact wrenches to help with the overhaul.

20200322_121811.jpg
 

Speedwoble

Active member
461
66
28
Location
New Holland, PA
Thanks Speedwoble, you always give good advice.

I have no intention of selling my SEE in the foreseeable future, nor do I plan on not fixing it. The problem is I don't really have time to fix it correctly before the move. My plan is to build a house and retire on the property I am moving the SEE to. As time allows I will fix it. I already have the copper nickle line to do it with.

You bring up a good point that I don't have to run the brake line in the same track as the original, so maybe I don't have to tip the cab. I just don't think I can get the fix done before I ship it this Saturday, and I am afraid that once I fix that leak I will find another, and another.... When I got my SEE the caps were missing off the reservoirs I suspect that water got in the lines, it certainly was in the master brake cylinder. I don't know, maybe that is far fetched, but 2 of the steel lines have failed on me that I know of. If I do tip the cab, will probably replace the rest with copper nickle just as a preventative measure, or at least the ones under the cab.

There is no grid power where I am moving it to, but I have bought a decent generator, so I can haul my compressor out so I can use my impact wrenches to help with the overhaul.
My point was that you may be able to do a temporary fix, but I recommend not, if you can avoid it. A temporary fix all to often becomes permanent and fails unexpectedly, while leaving the brakes in-op is pretty clear.
My first 2 had water in the brake system and it pitted the first master cylinder. The second Mog I did not discover the water until it froze in the winter and acted like a stuck caliper. I was able to get about a mile down the road and the caliper progressively clamped tighter until the mog couldn’t move. Let it sit for about 15 minutes and enough heat transferred into the brake system to thaw the ice and I was able to drive home.
The DOT 5 does not absorb the water, so it pools in the low points. One of those is the U bend where the hoses go into the calipers. Hence I removed those and drained them to make sure to get the water out. Then I bled the system from my master cylinder with my pressure bleeder.
Because of the issues on #1&#2, on my unimog #3, I bled the system as soon as I got it.
 

patrol578

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
I always knew I would be writing this someday....

The time has come to sell my SEE. Unfortunately, I am selling "for parts" since the transmission won't go into gear. See the classified section if you are interested.

This forum has been the best source of information anyone with a SEE could ever ask for. A big thanks to everyone here, especially the regulars!

Best wishes and stay healthy during these crazy times!!!

Patrol578
 

joeblack5

Active member
159
87
28
Location
State College PA
I always knew I would be writing this someday....

The time has come to sell my SEE. Unfortunately, I am selling "for parts" since the transmission won't go into gear. See the classified section if you are interested.

This forum has been the best source of information anyone with a SEE could ever ask for. A big thanks to everyone here, especially the regulars!

Best wishes and stay healthy during these crazy times!!!

Patrol578
Please check your messages, I can use a second unit for parts.

Thanks Johan
 

patrol578

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
Thanks guys. "Another chance" is what I gave it when I detached the loader and tipped the cab to get the cover off the transmission, only to find that the transmission would have to be pulled for a rebuild. Doing all that and putting it back together with nothing more than a hi-lift and hand tools is enough for me. I think I will always have the SEE/Unimog sickness, but for now I need to let it go.
 

The FLU farm

Well-known member
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Location
The actual midwest, NM.
Only five, since I sold what should've been a parts car. It was way too nice, just like my first attempt at buying a parts car.
What I really could use is a loader, or partial loader, and since yours is already off, would you mind mailing it to me?
 

patrol578

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
Only five, since I sold what should've been a parts car. It was way too nice, just like my first attempt at buying a parts car.
What I really could use is a loader, or partial loader, and since yours is already off, would you mind mailing it to me?
The loader is back on...that's why I needed the hi-lift! But I guess I could sell you the loader...with SEE attached, of course.
 

joeblack5

Active member
159
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28
Location
State College PA
Appreciate that, Johan.
The bummer is the long drive, or high cost of shipping. Unless you happen to have contacts.
I have not heard from patrol yet and unfortunately do not have his number. I have a trucker in the area that hauled the two 404 out of California and is now getting the little bus for my camper experiment on a 404. He is coming thru massachusets this day so I hope we can get something going before the trucker is gone out of the area. This trucker goes regulary to the west cost so may be he can take it along for an acceptable price.. but yeah shipping is expensive.
 
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