M416-A1 rebuild in progress!!!

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2ndchance

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Let me start off by saying that this site is a fantastic resource and you are all a great bunch of folks! I've been on here for awhile now, gathering data and prepping my rebuild.

The restoration continues. I thought I would take a moment to share some of my parts finds and give a little insight[/U][/I].


Parts Located


Surge Brake:

I found that the master cylinder from "53-64 CJ-3B" can work. I found it at Kaiser Willys (Part #805223) for $50.00. The surge brake system on mine is made by Toledo Hydro-Act and is still currently in production. Their replacement cost is $130. The one I received from Kaiser Willys was perfect. One thing though.. they painted it, then machined it. All the machined areas are NOT rust proofed. You will need to paint the master cylinder prior to install. Rustoleum spray paint is your friend. :)

Surge Brake Dampener Shock:

The only place I've been able to find a replacement for these are with Toledo Hydro-Act. I found that eTrailer.com sells them for $61.00 (Part #1844-2). Worked like a charm. CroftTrailer.Com had a better price. I found it after my build.

As mentioned in other posts. Replacement nylon pivot bushings for the surge is also a Toledo Hydro-Act part. eTrailer.com sells them for $5.09 each (
Part #1745). eTrailer has a good selection of parts for the Toledo Hydro-Act surge system. CroftTrailer.com also had these, at a cheaper price.

Leaf Spring C-Shackles:

I think we all know now that the one of the rear shackles has a right-hand loosy, instead of the common left-hand loosy. Not much info out there so I will state it here. The REAR-RIGHT shackle is a Right-hand loosy (just the one that holds the leaf spring). Mine took some damage and the rubber bushings were destroyed. I found that Kaiser Willy sold them for $13.00 each. You'll have to order a passenger AND driver side (Part #: 802062 and 802061). Again, from a "53-64 CJ-3B". These ended up being slightly taller, but not by much. That's not a bad thing... It improved my ground clearance by 1/2". :) Remember, the REAR-RIGHT is the Right-hand loosy. Ignore what the package tells you.

Race, Bearings, Oil Seal:

Originally I had listed the races, bearings and oil seal for a M416. Later I learned that they are NOT the same for the M416A1. M416A1 has a tapered spindle, where the M416 is a straight one. Basically, the inner is larger than the outer, where the M416 are the same. The correct numbers are:

larger inner: bearing #L68149 and race #L68111.

smaller outer: bearing #L44649 and race #L44610.
The oil seal is standard. You can get a complete kit at eTrailer.com for $12.00 per side. Stock # BK2-100. It's a bearing kit for a #84 type spindle. The nut washer they provide may not fit, so reuse yours.

I want to mention something about grease. You could use the standard grease that is out there. I chose to use a Marine Grade grease. The M416s are designed to float if you have less than 500lbs of cargo. With Marine Grade grease, you can feel more comfortable in taking your trailer across rivers, streams, or go float in the deep blue sea. The grease helps to repel the water better than regular bearing grease. I applied this grease onto every Zerk fitting on this trailer. Checker Auto, O'Riley's, NAPA.. they all carry it. O'Riley's was the cheapest.


Shocks:

Already mentioned. Napa (Part #RR 94038) is a good value @ $17.67 each. I'm going to start with these. If my trails get really rough, I may switch to one with a coil over the shock. As of right now, $75/shock is a bit expensive.

The new shocks have a thicker bushing on both ends of the shock. I struggled to get them on. At the end, I replaced the original washers with some thinner ones I found at Home Depot. I also replaced the cotter pins with longer ones. The thinner washers helped, but it was still impossible to get the cotter pins in without help. Here's my fix..


After seating the shock I slipped on the washer. I then placed an open-end wrench against the washer with the open end facing the cotter pin hole. Using a large C-clamp, I compressed the open-end wrench until the cotter pin hole was visible. Then, I dropped in the cotter pin. Simple! You just need a BIG C-clamp and something to protect the outer frame. I used some scrap wood. It also helps if a 2nd person is there to help hold the C-clamp, as some positions may cause the clamp to move around on the frame.


M416-A1 Date Plate:

M416 plates are everywhere, but M416-A1 is hard to find! I was able to find a company Machine Plates Online that can reproduce them but at a cost of $150. Ouch. However, they do offer a lasered etching on stainless steel. No more fading like the original silk-screened on aluminum. Hey, maybe we M416-A1 owners can do a group-buy! :) UPDATE: I am searching for another company to get these done. I obtained a really good PDF file of the Parkhurst data plate.

Wheel Cylinders:

The wheel cylinders are the same as the ones used on 10"-12" drum for marine trailers. I found a suitable replacement and it's CAST metal, like the original. They are made by Redline and is sold at eTrailer.com They look the same, and the inside diameter is 1", just like mine. The cost is $21.95 each. Right Hand Part #: BP17-020. Left Hand Part #: BP17-030.

UFP also makes an aluminum one and is a few bucks cheaper. Pacific Trailers sells them for $19.95 each. Right Hand
Part #: U1012WCR. Left Hand Part #: U1012WCL.

I went with this one. I figured for a few bucks more, I can avoid rusting and reduce the weight by a few ounces. My backplate must have been slightly bent, as one of the wheel cylinders didn't quite fit. A grinder took care of that. These suckers are beefy so it could take a little grinding.


Again.. CroftTrailer.Com had the lower price at $18.00 for each standard cylinder. Part number:
1906 and 1907. Hind sight is 20/20... :(

12v bulb conversion:

I tossed the original wiring and went with a conventional 4-wire setup. This required bulb replacements. For the brake/turn signal, I used a 21.5-watt Sylvania #7506. Others have used #1156, which is a 26.5-watt bulb. The driving lights I used 5-watt Sylvania #7007. Others have used #98, which is a 8.5-watt bulb. I probably should have went with the brighter #98, but this was what I found at the time. You can use whatever wattage you want. When searching for a bulb, just remember that you need a single filament bulb, and the bayonet pins are the same height and at opposite ends. The diameter of the connections is pretty common. It's a Ba15S connector. The original bulbs consist of one big one and 4 small ones. I wired the big one as my brake/turn signal. All the others will be driving lights.

insight:


I didn't see it mentioned, but I discovered that the front bolt for the leaf spring is pressed in, much like a tire lug. So, I removed the cotter pin, backed out the castle nut to the end of the bolt, and hammered away til the bolt came out. I used a large punch to drive it the rest of the way out. LOL. I didn't figure this out until I ran my 30gal compressor empty trying to turn the darn bolt.


It's worth mentioning again. The REAR-RIGHT shackle is a Right-hand loosy (just the bottom one that holds the leaf spring).


When working on my spindles, I noticed that I didn't have a lock washer or locking nut. It was just the spindle nut and a cotter pin. The spindle nut used a 29mm socket to take off. This was the same socket I used to remove the big bolt to drop the safety chain and the bolt for the landing leg.


I had planned or buying new composite rear lens covers, as mine were sun faded. By accident, I oversprayed some
carb cleaner and it landed on the lens. To my surprise, that cleaned/cleared up the lens! Carb cleaner eats away at plastics. Therefore, I blasted the front/rear of the lenses, then quickly blew off/dried off the liquid with my airgun. The results were instant. I was able to touch the lens after 3 mins. I didn't want to touch it before, as the plastic may still be soft and I didn't want to risk smudging the newly restored lens.

Final Note: I completed my restoration on April 5, 2012. I'm updating the original info for accuracy. Have fun on your build!
 

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hndrsonj

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Do you have a pic of the new data plate? I also can't get the link to them to work (may be my computer at work though).
 

2ndchance

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No, I don't have a pic of the plate. Neither do they. I emailed them a pic of a sample plate. They said the cost is $150 because they would have to "create it". After that, it would be around $30 a plate.
 
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joshs1ofakindxj

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I didn't see it mentioned, but I discovered that the front bolt for the leaf spring is pressed in, much like a tire lug.
This was not the case with my M416, and certainly not the case with the CJ-3B suspension that the M416 copies.

My trailer was made by Steven's, and it did not have the suspension/shock mounts welded and bolted, just bolted.

It's your call on going through the hassle of taking them out. If you're not seeing a lot of localized rust around those areas, then I wouldn't be too concerned.

Regarding wheel cylinders, go to your local Advance Auto Parts or similar and if you have a good reputation with someone there or a friend working there, ask to compare your wheel cylinder to what is on the shelf.

There are probably only 20 - 30 different wheel cylinders stocked, so it won't take you too long, and their mostly in clear bags making things easier.

If you don't know the guy behind the counter, go when it is not busy at all, like late on a Tuesday evening, but not 15 minutes till closing, and ask nicely to look at wheel cylinders.

That is a nice, well detailed post by the way.
 

2ndchance

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I thought it was odd that only one shock mount was welded. After further inspection, it turns out that that shock mount was NOT welded. It was just stuck with paint, grease, and grime. With a LOT of brute force, I was able to break it loose. The leaf spring mounts are definitely tack welded.

I just got finished power blasting the frame. Once it dries and I put a wire wheel to it, I will look for signs of rusting. If not, then I will seal them up and paint them over.


I have the opportunity to get a discount on powder coating everything (minus the tubs and leaf springs) for a decent price. Before that, I intended on just using rattle cans of Rustoleum. Would it be bad of me to powder coat it, and detour away from being original? There is a lot of benefits to powder coating, though. Strength, corrosion protection, looks...
 
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2ndchance

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aua WHOA! Stop this train! What did I miss???? aua

Did I screw up here? Bearings and Race. Is my M416A1
not the same as the M416?

The M416 uses 4 of the same bearings for both wheels. I purchased two of the SET45 kits from Timken.


I just read on
G503.com's forum that the M416A1 has two different sizes. The internal one is smaller than the external one???

The post reads:


The 416 has a non-tapered shaft and uses the same bearing on both inner and outer aspects of the drum (bearing #8762093 & race #7536132). The inner seal is #516992.
The m4161A uses two different bearing sets. The larger,inner one is bearing #L68149 and race #L68111. The smaller, outer set uses bearing #L44610 and race #L44649.
The inner seal is #15529.
 
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2ndchance

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Well, since I didn't get a response regarding my concern, I had to search for a guy smarter than me (which was not hard). :)

I met with the owner of Arizona Axle and he looked at the drum and said that it was an old marine drum for boat trailers. Not far fetched, since these suckers "can" go float.


He looked at the bearings, races, and seal. He said that all of these were common. Seal is a standard trailer seal. I asked for a model/part #. He said there really isn't one. Thare are only 2 sizes and the difference is so small that it didn't matter which you used (as long as you lubricate the rubber part of the seal).


Below is the original info, which has good part numbers.


The larger,inner one is bearing #L68149 and race #L68111.

The smaller, outer set uses bearing #L44649 and race #L44610.
 
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2ndchance

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Oh, I forgot to mention. These bearing kits can be purchased from most online trailer parts places for around $25.00. This includes new bearings, races, seals, and cotter pins.
 
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2ndchance

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First Days of the build

Alright! Trailer is finished! With the exception of my wheels and tires, it's good to go. This was a fun project and I'm sorta sorry that it's over. I updated my original post with all my research and prices, model numbers, and links to retailers. Hopefully it will make it easier for the next guy.

Monday, Feb 13, 2012. The build started.


Monday: I invested in some air tools and a friend loaned me his 30gal 7.5hp vertical compressor.

Wednesday: We spent several hours installing the compressor and updating it with a new air filter, air regulator, and an oiler.

Thursday @ 6pm, I wheeled the M416 trailer into the garage and got to work. My dad joined me in the fun and we started to tear down things so we can separate the tub from the frame and inspect the electrical.

The lens is removed by loosening the 6 visible screws. The screws don't come all the way out of the lens. They are retained by a little crush washer. The seam was stuck because the lights were painted over. A razor blade solved that problem.

One of my lens covers were cracked. Both of them had bad seals, and moisture got in. The bottom bulb held some water and corroded the contacts. The front lens portion is also plastic. Probably not worth salvaging. I can buy new ones for about $15 each. The rear housing is plastic. I think I can take it all apart, wire brush the metal components and/or put them into a vibrating tumbler filled with sand, and restore them.

The license plate holder w/ light can't be original. It was pretty garfed up. I pulled it off and straightened up the bent areas. The light was another story. Pretty corroded and the plastic lens was milky white. I did find a replacement for $15.00. This part is going into the trash.

The two jerry can holders were in decent shape. One had a bent in corner. My dad fixed it with a hammer.

The tires were pretty seized up on the hub. After removing the tire lugs, I had to use a crow bar to break them free.

Next came the fenders. Normally there are 5 bolts that hold the fender in place. The bottom two on each side were missing. Strangely, the 6 bolts that were present, most of them were different sizes and lengths. That's not a good sign. I may need to replace every serviceable bolt to keep them consistent.

Once the fenders were removed, there are only 8 bolts left to remove the tub from the frame. There are 3 in the back and one on each side towards the front. They are quite visible, as the tub had mounting tabs. On the underside, there are suppose to be 3 more bolts that attach the tub to the cross-members for the frame. They were not present.

Years of debris, two coats of military and forestry service paint, made removing the tub quite difficult. In a perfect world, it should lift straight up. Darn thing was stuck. So, I broke out the rubber mallet and started banging on every seam and connection of the tub to the frame. Then, I sprayed those areas with WD-40. After 15 minutes, I climbed to the front of the trailer, stood on top of the landing leg, gripped the tub and dead-lifted the sucker.

Note: There is only 2 ways to get the tub off. Pull the tub straight up with equal pressure, or jerk the front like I did, then jerk up the rear, insert several blocks/spacer to get the tub mounting tabs to clear the frame, and slide the whole thing forward to clear the frame's lip... then up.

It's was now midnight and my arms feel like soggy noodles. Friday after work I will get started again.
 

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2ndchance

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Friday, Feb 17:

Now that there was light, I could inspect the tub. There are some areas that have small holes (2mm). Some areas have larger holes (1/4"). Those could probably be flattened and filled in. Ug, right near the front, there is a large gash. That's where the tub was rubbing on the front of the frame.

Ok you welders out there. What do you think? Should I cut out the large gash and bigger holes, weld in a replacement piece, or cut the whole bottom off and weld in a new piece?

In the mean time, I'm going back out there and get a few ours in. Fridays are good for me because I don't have to help my kids with their homework. I get to put in 5 solid hours. Tonight, I'm going to tackle the A1 style lunnete, the master brake system, brake lines, and electrical.


 

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2ndchance

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Friday, Feb 17 (continued):

I didn't get very far today. Ran into some major issues with the Lunette and hydraulic brake system. I started by removing the cap from the cylinder assembly to check the condition of the brake fluid. I barely twisted the cover and... SNAP.

The cover had all this powder on it, as if the aluminum was eaten away by the brake fluid. I peeked inside the container and all I saw was powder. Looked like aluminum mixed with magnesium, mixed with dirt... This thing is toast.

Well, I had to continue and look what's inside the lunette housing. From the repair manual, it shows that the lunette has a spring and a shock. Getting this off was a pain, as the bushings were all seized up. Once I finally got it out, it was apparent that the shock was no good. I wonder where I can find a replacement?

So, I have to make a decision. Do I buy another cylinder assembly, and restore this trailer back to original, or ditch the brake system. Either way, I had to remove the shock from the lunette. This shock HAS to be there, otherwise the lunette will just slam back and forth. Well, this was no easy task. The bolt was seized by the metal sleeve inside the bushing. I had to grind, hit it with a torch, and chisel it off. I'll take it with me to an auto parts store and see if they can find me a suitable one. Probably a shock from a motorcycle, UTV, or a golf cart.

Next, I removed the hand brake assembly and the brake cable. Pretty easy. No drama here. Happened so easily and quickly, I forgot to snap pics.

I fell behind on the electrical. I was hoping to get it all removed so I can start restoring the taillights. All the rubber waterproof connectors were dried up. So, I clipped the wire at the connector. The metal cover that covers the main electrical connection is held in by self-taping screws. Those suckers are on tight! At the end, I snipped all the wires. The original harness was looking kinda sad.

It's 1am. I give up for tonight. I should be able to tackle the rest of the braking system tomorrow and finish up the wires. I'll stop at Home Depot tomorrow, grab a bunch of wire, and start making a new wiring harness.
 

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2ndchance

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Monday Feb 20: Decided to take a small break today and not work too long (or too early) on the trailer. I got sidetracked yesterday and didn't get to finish up the electrical and brakes. This was the project today.

Electrical: Man, I hated to do this. The factory wire loom was not working out. Every connection had a male/female rubber cup seal and they were all dried or stuck. I have to remove it for the sandblasting, and the only solution is to cut it. With a replacement cost of $75, I may have to forget keeping it original and just wire loom it. Sucks.

Brakes: Yeah, the drum is pretty shot. I did find a possible replacement for $50. The lunette shock dampener is around $60. Turns out, Balcrank/Toledo Actuators makes a duplicate setup and is still currently used today.

All the brake lines came out fairly easily. A little brake cleaner and an airgun cleaned out the metal brake lines. The rubber one that distributes brake fluid to the two hubs was not cooperating. It was blocked on both ends and nothing was working. I even tried to shove a wire close hanger through it. I guess 15 years of gunk finally cemented itself inside the hose.

My friend
Geoff gave me some hope. I drove the hose down to him and he assured me that it's something that is replaceable for around $20 and still common.

Well, since it's replaceable for only $20, I will try a drastic measure. I took a drill and a small diameter drill bit to it. It took a few minutes of slow drilling, but I was able to get past the blockage. I blasted 1/2 can of brake cleaner and it finally dissolved the blockage.

Hey! I discovered something pretty cool! I was planning on buying new lens covers because these ones were pretty sun faded. I accidentally dripped some brake cleaner on one of the lenses and, to my surprise, the dripped area cleared up! So, I blasted the front and back of both of them, then quickly blew the airgun on them and dried off the brake cleaner fluid. I didn't dare rub on the lens, as brake cleaner melts/softens most plastics pretty quickly.

W
ow! What a difference!

Now, before you guys start spraying down your plastic auto headlights, remember that brake cleaner can dissolve paint and plastics! So mask the areas well, and do at your own risk!

Before and after pics are below.

 

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2ndchance

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Wednesday Feb 22: Not much work done for the rest of that week as I was off to a Javalina hunt. My group tagged out 4/5 pigs. It was a good hunt.

In the meantime
my dad and I went through and removed all the part off the frame that we could, in preparation for sandblasting. We also removed the shocks and will drop the axle and leaf springs tomorrow.

I'm still trying to figure out if I am going to flip the axle or not. In other posts from military web sites, it seems that even when you flip the axle and try to run 33" the fender will rub when there is a decent load on them.

I may just keep running these unidirectional tires. New replacements are around $100 each. The Falken ATS tires I have are $205 each.

I created my shopping list for replacement parts (full parts list is on the first post).


 

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2ndchance

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Friday 2/24: Good news! I found a solution for the wheel cylinders. They seem to be the same ones that are used on marine trailers with a 10"-12" drum.

I went ahead and ordered a pair. Picked up the Monroe shocks, ordered all my wiring harness, brake lines, master cylinders, and shock dampeners.

I spent an hour cleaning out the original tail light housings. With a dremel in hand, I polished up all the light bulb connectors and cleaned out all the gunk on the metal parts. I'm going to rewire it, but only use 2 of the 4 bulbs. One for turn and one for driving/brake.

My dad has sorta taken over my project. He took out all the pieces of the frame and power washed them. During this process, I noticed that the shock mount (that I thought was welded on) moved a bit. I banged it with a hammer and it finally popped off the frame.

So, the ball is rolling. I'm going to drive the frame parts to Glendale Powdercoat on Tuesday and get an estimate on powder coating the frame, parts, and axle.

Note: Powerder coating came to $135. Super deal from a great company. OH, and for the record, that's my dad in the pajamas and bedroom slippers banging away at the shocks... not me.



 

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