1952 M135 W/Winch

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rustystud

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Cold weather got here early this year and I came nowhere close to achieving my goal, but got some more done.

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I found this old paint on one of the window frames and thought my new paint matches the color really well.

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These were in an old GMC truck catalog from the 50's and I found it interesting.

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Most people don't know this but GMC/Chevy and IHC where some of the first production engines that used a full flow oil lubrication system and not the old "splash" system use by Ford and others back then. I think it had to do with keeping their military contracts, that is just my opinion though.
 

Another Ahab

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Most people don't know this but GMC/Chevy and IHC where some of the first production engines that used a full flow oil lubrication system and not the old "splash" system use by Ford and others back then. I think it had to do with keeping their military contracts, that is just my opinion though.
Interesting to know, thanks rustystud.

How did that help them keep their contracts?
 

rustystud

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Interesting to know, thanks rustystud.

How did that help them keep their contracts?
With the full pressure oil system you can take your vehicle on most any incline with no worries about oil starvation. Also it provides for a higher revving engine so more power, plus you get a much longer engine life.
If your the government agency procuring military vehicles wouldn't you want the best available ?
 

USMC 00-08

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I ran across this while looking up the Lube Order. I'm not sure that there ever was a revision to TM 9-8024 that reflected the change in checking the transmission fluid after the neutral safety lock was installed. I also wonder if this is even the best way to check it. It is definitely more safe, but would the transmission suffer for it later down the road?

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m1010plowboy

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Hey there Oklahoma, good to hear your voi......good to see y.......it's good to read your typing.

The Maintenance boys didn't introduce this until 1962 which is interesting. Did the U.S. keep injury reports from maintenance depots in a museum somewhere? If the G749 bit some guys in the 10 years prior to the PM change, it'd be good to have some documentation for display.
Injuries could help drive the point home about reviewing 'all' the Technical manuals before operations.

I've been doing it both wrong and right for ten years.

What's going on inside that transmission when it changes from N to D? Where's Rusty? Push my head inside that transmission and tell me where the oil is going when we check fluid levels, please.
 

SturmTyger380

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Well you want as much of the transmission oil to be in action in the system so the level can be checked.

When the engine is running the front impeller is spinning and pumping oil around. When you are in drive the oil goes through some other areas of the transmission but I would think the amount is not that much more than the impeller is pumping. So I think safety overruled the slight difference in how the oil levels would be seen.
 

USMC 00-08

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I'm at the point where I need stencils or decals for my gauges. Dave at Delta Team Decals might be able to make them. Does anyone of you have a gauge panel that has all of these markings still on it? None of my trucks have markings left for me to be able to measure. Here is what the email from Dave said so if any one can get these measurements for me, I would sure appreciate it.


"Yes, I have the markings like, HIGH BEAM, FUEL, OIL, ect. in either decal or paint mask. The decals tend to work better on those small fonts. The other markings you have around the speedo, I do not have, nor have I ever seen. They could be replicated but I would need some measurements like height of font and length to the arrows and diameter of the speedo to go around."




M135 Gauge Cluster Markings.jpg
 
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